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An individual is capable of developing a prototype of a hydrogen powered engine, imagine what a multibillion company would have accomplished, if they wanted/had wanted to develop an alternative fuel diesel.

Which choice is correct?

Thanks!
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New2grammarCould you help me understand why they is incorrect?

We do refer to a company as they, don't we?
I probably would have said "they". Either one is possible.
CJ
Comments  
"had wanted"

But there are a number of other problems with this sentence. This is how I would write it:

"An individual is capable of developing a prototype of a hydrogen-powered engine, so imagine what a multibillion-dollar company would have accomplished if it had wanted to develop an alternative [fuel diesel]."

As necessary, replace "dollar" with whatever currency is meant.

I don't understand what "an alternative fuel diesel" means. Does it mean "diesel fuel"? "Diesel-fuelled engine"?
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I'm sorry. I wanted to say alternative fuel engine. My fingers have their own mind Emotion: sad

Could you help me understand why they is incorrect?

We do refer to a company as they, don't we?

Thanks
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
"They" is not actually incorrect (at least, not in the version of English that I speak), but in this sentence I personally prefer "it" because the idea of the company as a single entity with a single will is quite strong. Others may disagree.

Another picky point. IMO an "alternative fuel engine" might be a "fuel engine" that is "alternative", while an "alternative-fuel engine" is definitely an engine that uses alternative fuel. So, I'd use a hyphen.
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