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* fast-food restaurant: restaurant with no waiters. Meals are * ... out in a * bag. Often has a drive-by window.

"Drive-through" or, possibly, "drive-up" for me. The only thing that can be "drive-by" is a shooting.

Since we never stop at them, they are "drive-bys" for us.
dg (domain=ccwebster)
* fast-food restaurant: restaurant with no waiters. Meals are * ... out in a * bag. Often has a drive-by window.

"Drive-through" or, possibly, "drive-up" for me. The only thing that can be "drive-by" is a shooting.

No, there are drive-by inspections, too. And I usually drive by the window; I never drive through it. I've never seen a window that I drive up to, and don't think that would be useful, as it would be in front of my car, rather than beside it.

Steve
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"Drive-through" or, possibly, "drive-up" for me. The only thing that can be "drive-by" is a shooting.

No, there are drive-by inspections, too. And I usually drive by the window; I never drive through it. I've never ... and don't think that would be useful, as it would be in front of my car, rather than beside it.

You're supposed to drive "through" the blasted thing, that's where the food is!

dg (domain=ccwebster)
As at any Mickey Dees I've ever seen.

There are McDonaldseses in food courts that share their tables with other purveyors of comestibles. Also, the one near my ... McDonalds. There were about half a dozen high stools along a counter at the window, but no tables per se.

One of the original McDonalds in Chicago was window service only. I don't remember if they had any seating outside or not.

It seems like it was on the South Side somewhere, but I'm not sure.
Interesting that you use "buffet" to mean "putative restaurant featuring ... kinds of food on it that you go up to?

In a cafeteria, you go through the line, pick out what you want, and pay for each item. You can ... you wish for no additional charge. (You may be restricted to one serving of meat, though. Some do, some don't.)

If you say so sir.
You could call a buffet a "buffet restaurant", but I've never heard anyone do it. Perhaps we're more clever down here than they are in New Yawk and don't need everything spelled out.

I've seen some places that use "Buffet" in their name like all those "China Buffet" places they have in small-town suburbia. But I would never use the word "buffet" to refer to the restaurant that would be like calling a restaurant that features a salad bar a "salad bar". "Buffet place" is probably the term I'd reach for.
M-W seems to agree with me, Coop:
1 SIDEBOARD
2 a a counter for refreshments b chiefly British : a restaurant operatedas a public convenience (as in a railway station) c : a meal set out on a buffet or table for ready access and informal service

That is, the buffet (in AmE) is not the restaurant that serves the food, but the food itself, in its waiting to be taken form.

Steny '08!
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I really fail to see any problem with McDs labeling ... stand where food is served but no seating is provided.

I think a McDonald's is a "fast-food restaurant" but not a restaurant proper, which is a sit-down restaurant.

It's a restaurant. I remember that in Hungary, where every restaurant is classified by some state authority, Ron's places are category 1, up there with the finest, but I think that's because the classification depends on the price of the food.
And yes, a hamburger is a sandwich. Another Hungarian memory is a fast-food place selling a vegetarian burger which turned out to be just some salad in a bun, the hamburger label being more closely associated there with the bunwich than with the patty.
Adrian
I've seen some places that use "Buffet" in their name like all those "China Buffet" places they have in ... AmE) is not the restaurant that serves the food, but the food itself, in its waiting to be taken form.

That's you, but it's not how it is for everyone. Perfectly normal exchanges would be:
Where do you want to eat tonight?
Let's go to a buffet.
OK, let's try Holiday House.
or,
Let's go to a salad bar.
OK, let's try Sweet Tomatoes.
I'm not so sure I agree. The ol' fashioned (= ... though it is, or includes a plurality of, movie theater(s).

I don't see how we can accept that an old-time bioscope or kinema is a theatre without allowing a multiplex. (I'm tempted to drag in lecture theatres and operating theatres, but am not sure it would help.)

It seems to me that it's natural for a multiplex to refer to a film "screening in theatre 4", so I'd agree with Areff on this one.

Matti
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I remember that in Hungary, where every restaurant is classified by some state authority, Ron's places are category 1, up there with the finest, but I think that's because the classification depends on the price of the food.

Not on its magnificent architecture and superb interior? The McDonald's at the Nyugati (Western) Railway Station in Budapest is in a league of its own - see http://tinyurl.com/5e7aa and http://tinyurl.com/3h2qr . Category 1 of anybody's money.

Katy Jennison
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