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Rye bread and different types of (dark brown) mixed flour ... often, since it has always been thought of as "unhealthy".

Yes. I grew up with white bread being served only on Sundays.

And in Dutch, the translation for honeymoon is "white bread days". (Where the "white" refers to the color of the bread rather than the color of a compound object known as bread-days)
Jitze
My conclusion is that, like most wives of some long standing, you really don't listen to your husband.

The Perfect Couple
Once upon a time, a perfect man and a perfect woman met. After a perfect courtship, they had a perfect wedding.
Their life together was, of course, perfect.
One snowy, stormy Christmas Eve, this perfect couple was driving their perfect car along a winding road, when they noticed someone at the side of the road in distress. Being the perfect couple, they stopped to help.

There stood Santa Claus with a huge bundle of toys. Not wanting to disappoint any children on the eve of Christmas, the perfect couple loaded Santa and his toys into their vehicle. Soon they were driving along delivering the toys.
Unfortunately, the driving conditions deteriorated and the perfect couple and Santa Claus had an accident. Only one of them survived the accident.
Question: Who was the survivor?
(Scroll down for the answer.)
Answer: The perfect woman survived. She's the only one who really existed in the first place. Everyone knows there is no Santa Claus and there is no such thing as a perfect man.
** Women stop reading here, that is the end of the joke. **

Men keep scrolling.
So, if there is no perfect man and no Santa Claus, the woman must have been driving. This explains why there was a car accident.
Men Keep scrolling
By the way, if you're a woman and you're still reading, this illustrates another point: Women never listen.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
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I've only ever heard it said "another thing coming". That's how we say in in Massachusetts.

Didn't your fellow Bay Stater Dinkin know it as "think"? Steny '08!

I don't know Dinkin so I can't comment on his take on it.
Jitze Couperus infrared:
Yes. I grew up with white bread being served only on Sundays.

And in Dutch, the translation for honeymoon is "white bread days". (Where the "white" refers to the color of the bread rather than the color of a compound object known as bread-days)

All three of you seem to be saying that white bread is a special treat. I'm totally unable to look at it that way. To me it looks and tastes like blotting paper. If I arrive late at the shops, when all the good bread is gone and only white bread is left, I'll go without bread rather than suffer through the white stuff. I'll make an exception for French bread, but that's only because it's customary with French bread to thrown away the fluffy white interior and eat only the crust.
Sometimes I wonder about all that left-over white bread at the shops. It seems to indicate a mismatch between what the sellers supply and what the buyers want. It can be hard sometimes to find multigrain bread because it's snapped up as soon as it's put on the shelves. Standard wholemeal bread is a little more available, but it sells out fairly quickly. Meanwhile, the bulk of the shelf space is taken up with loaves and loaves of white bread that nobody wants to buy.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
One snowy, stormy Christmas Eve, this perfect couple was driving their perfect car along a winding road, when they noticed someone at the side of the road in distress. Being the perfect couple, they stopped to help.

obAUE: is this perfect couple a singular or a plural entity? The "was" seems very wrong.
Matti
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Matti Lamprhey infrared:
One snowy, stormy Christmas Eve, this perfect couple was ... distress. Being the perfect couple, they stopped to help.

obAUE: is this perfect couple a singular or a plural entity? The "was" seems very wrong.

This perfect couple was driving its perfect car ... This could work if the car had dual controls.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
... If I arrive late at the shops, when all the good bread is gone and only white bread is ... that's only because it's customary with French bread to thrown away the fluffy white interior and eat only the crust.

I do the same with hamburger buns and submarine rolls. The other type of white bread loaf that is acceptable is sourdough, I think you will agree.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Jitze Couperus infrared:

And in Dutch, the translation for honeymoon is "white bread ... than the color of a compound object known as bread-days)

All three of you seem to be saying that white bread is a special treat. I'm totally unable to look ... that's only because it's customary with French bread to thrown away the fluffy white interior and eat only the crust.

You are right about the quality of what is called "white bread" in the USA. Jukka, Jitze, and I were talking about white bread as it is known in other parts of the world, in other words, we were talking about something like French bread. No comparison.
USA white bread is an animal onto its own, I think. Weird, but with certain embellishments, like some good cheese and lunchmeat, palatable. It takes nothing away from those items in the flavor department. Sort of like tofu. You wouldn't want to eat a slice of it by itself.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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All three of you seem to be saying that white bread is a special treat.

White bread (as well as sweet pastries, buns etc. baked from white flour) was something of a luxury here up until the late 19th century. I'm not much of an agricultural historian, but it probably had something to do with the relative popularity of different varieties of grain: wheat was simply not cultivated here as much as rye and barley (because of tradition, but soil and climate probably being strong factors as well), and was therefore in short supply.
I'm totally unable to look at it that way. To me it looks and tastes like blotting paper.

I cannot exactly relate to that experience, but I can admit white bread starts tasting something pretty much like that if you have to live on it for extended periods of time. Too much of anything tends to make you sick of it, and I would probably get rather bored of the whole concept of "bread" if there was nothing else than the white variety available.

Still, buying the white stuff every now and then (as a "treat", if you will) works for me, even though the kind of bread I usually consume is rather something like this:

(I can assure you, the Finnish bakeries are inventing new kinds of packaged fresh bread products like madmen. There are dozens and dozens of different varieties on the market at any one time: sour black bread, sweet black bread, something in-between, white bread, sweet black bread with raisins, heart-shaped, round, round and flat with a hole in the middle, oval-shaped slices, rectangular slices, bread with perforations (so you can easily break off a slice), bread which is neither sliced nor perforated, large bread loaves, small bread slices, oat bread, rye bread, barley bread, wheat bread, multigrain, hard bread, soft bread, crispbread etc. etc. - this is just one crazy bread country; we even have rehab clinics for bread addicts! (No, we don't. I just made that up.))
If I arrive late at the shops, when all the good bread is gone and only white bread is left, I'll go without bread rather than suffer through the white stuff.

Hmm, interesting. Having to settle for leftovers - yes, I've been there - but here the hungry hoards usually still leave something for you to pick up, even of the darker variety. What is left is probably not exactly fresh from the oven, but I've never seen it completely sold out. (Then again, I must admit there is usually more of the white stuff left than the other way around, although not in any hugely disproportionate manner.)
Sometimes I wonder about all that left-over white bread at the shops. It seems to indicate a mismatch between what ... bulk of the shelf space is taken up with loaves and loaves of white bread that nobody wants to buy.

My local grocery shop devotes approximately 1/4 of their shelf space for white bread and the remaining 3/4 for the rest. (No, not of the entire shelf space of the shop, you silly. We're not that crazy.)

* * *
ObAUE: What are the different common names for various types (and shapes) of bread in English?
For example, how would you call the kind of slices in my first link above? Each of them is flat, oval-shaped, and about the size of your palm. (They are baked as small, flat mini loafs, each of which is then sliced into two at the bakery, before packaging.)
Or how would you call a large, round, flat variety with a hole in the middle:

Or something like this:

From what I have gathered, "loaf" is generally used for the kind of bread that has elongated roundish shape and is somewhat plump and fluffy in its appearance, but can you also use it for the above (flattish) examples?

znark
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