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Jukka Aho wrote, in part:
Hmm, interesting. Having to settle for leftovers - yes, I've been there - but here the hungry hoards usually still leave something for

hordes
you to pick up, even of the darker variety.

(They are baked as small, flat mini loafs, each of which is then

loaves
sliced into two at the bakery, before packaging.)

"into two pieces" or "in two" would be my choices.

I hope you don't mind my suggestions regarding your English (which is excellent, by the way).

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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Skitt filted:
USA white bread is an animal onto its own, I think. Weird, but with certain embellishments, like some good cheese ... items in the flavor department. Sort of like tofu. You wouldn't want to eat a slice of it by itself.

Not without first stripping off the crusts, wadding the remainder up into a ball and compressing it until it turns into a sort of putty...that's the very best way to enjoy white milk-bread, at least (if memory serves) when you're seven years old..r
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... If I arrive late at the shops, when all ... away the fluffy white interior and eat only the crust.

I do the same with hamburger buns and submarine rolls. The other type of white bread loaf that is acceptable is sourdough, I think you will agree.

Abbott Solutely.
=20
dg (domain=3Dccwebster)
Charles Riggs infrared:
... If I arrive late at the shops, when all ... away the fluffy white interior and eat only the crust.

I do the same with hamburger buns and submarine rolls. The other type of white bread loaf that is acceptable is sourdough, I think you will agree.

Agreed for the sourdough, although I don't recall ever finding really good sourdough outside the San Francisco Bay area.

Thinking back, I realise that there was a time in my childhood when the nature of Australian white bread changed. Our family always bought something called a "sandwich loaf", which was a lot taller than the typical modern square loaf, and which probably had more roughage in it. All of a sudden sliced bread appeared, and it differed from our usual bread in many more ways than the slicing: - it was wrapped in plastic;
- you couldn't buy it hot, as it was already many hours old by the time it was delivered;
- the loaves were much smaller than the customary loaves (but a bit more expensive);
- it was much whiter than real white bread;
- it had a high air content, i.e. the density was very low.

For my father sliced bread became a political issue. It was trucked up from Melbourne (the nearest big city, about 100 km away) rather than being baked locally, and it was clearly aimed at driving the local bakery out of business. As it turned out the local bakery survived - somebody still had to produce the cakes and pies and various specialty items - but my father was correct in general terms, in that country towns did get badly hit by the general tendency of huge centralised factories to kill off local businesses.
Other people apparently didn't look at it that way. I recall that at school I would still be halfway through my lunch when everyone else ran off to play, because my sandwiches were twice the size of theirs, and my bread didn't evaporate as soon as you put it in your mouth.
Many years later huge numbers of "hot bread shops" started to appear, as people became sick of their plastic bread. The mass-produced bread, however, still accounts for a vast majority of bread consumption in this country.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
From what I have gathered, "loaf" is generally used for the kind of bread that has elongated roundish shape and is somewhat plump and fluffy in its appearance, but can you also use it for the above (flattish) examples?

In SupermarketE a single integral pita thing is a "loaf".

Steny '08!
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In SupermarketE a single integral pita thing is a "loaf".

Such as one of these: ?
Just checking: In that case, these

are loaves, too, even though they are much smaller in size?

What about the "integral" part? These are sliced in two, much the same way as hamburger buns are. They come that way in their bag: there is the top slice and the bottom slice. Does it matter? Are the separate(d) slices still called "loaves"? Or "slices"? (If neither, what would you call them?)
When does a loaf turn into a sandwhich? (I know, this is a slippery slope to the minefield of fervent philosophical ponderings...)

znark
(corrections snipped)
I hope you don't mind my suggestions regarding your English

Not at all. Any suggestions for improvements or corrections are welcome - after all, getting better with my English is the reason why I'm reading this group in the first place.
(which is excellent, by the way).

I'm halfway there. I know how to explain configuring Outlook Epress to someone and I can launch into a very boring, long discussion of the relative merits and technical differences of interlaced and non-interlaced digital video (or about creating web pages, or whatever technical.) However, if I was suddenly transported to an English-speaking country I would probably have problems with silly, simple everyday concepts such as finding the correct name for things like "toilet brush" or "garden hose", or being asked some standard idiomatic questions like "For here or to go?" at the counter of some burger place.

znark
When does a loaf turn into a sandwhich?[/nq]^^
Noticed it before you guys! Do I now get the privilege of OY!ing myself?

znark
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Jukka Aho filted:
When does a loaf turn into a sandwhich?

^^
Noticed it before you guys! Do I now get the privilege of OY!ing myself?

Depends...what were you trying to underline?...actually, I see it now, but what I originally saw highlighted was "n into a sand"..r
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