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Well, no one else had a problem. Just the little old onion-disliker me.

A good friend who dislikes onions told of how long it took her mother to realize that "If I cut them up small enough, she won't notice" was exactly the wrong approach.

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Well, no one else had a problem. Just the little old onion-disliker me.

A good friend who dislikes onions told of how long it took her mother to realize that "If I cut them up small enough, she won't notice" was exactly the wrong approach.

Exactly. I can tolerate onions as part of a dish as long as they are in big enough pieces to be easily recognizable and thus easily removed. (I eat onion rings, you know; I just remove the onion and eat the rest.)

Maria Conlon
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Mac's still calls it one, and who knows from hamburgers ... and a bun is used instead of a hard roll?

I think the difference is that the hamburger has the beef patty. The beef patty has concept-transformative and category-shifting effects that bring the hamburger out of the sandwich and into the hamburger, if you catch my drift.

I caught your drift some years back. I see the problem, but I also know there is a great deal of variety in the things known as "sandwiches".
There's no such thing as a beef patty sandwich, unless the patty melt is a sandwich, which I have conceded it might be, in which case something else is at work here perhaps the bun.

(I'm not sure I understand, even after looking up the American noun "melt", what a patty melt is.)
If the bun is the problem, can I call the things I make from slices of French bread and a hamburger patty sandwiches?
Aren't pork barbecue sandwiches, which I serve in buns as do most restaurants in North Carolina, home to some of the finest of them, true sandwiches? By the way, there's a sandwich, as I think most people would call it, that is never sliced in two, either. Okay, Sara cuts hamburgers in two, but that is rather uncommon.
Charles Riggs
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On 8 Dec 2004 16:03:58 GMT, CyberCypher
Areff wrote on 08 Dec 2004:

I think the difference is that the hamburger has the ... something else is at work here perhaps the bun.

I think a hamburger can be a sandwhich when it's between two pieces of toast instead of on a bun.

I think there's no question about it. On the larger question, when I toast the bun halves after removing the fluffy part inside, I don't see a whole lot of difference between that sort of bun and two pieces of white toast.
How about organic peanut butter, sliced banana, and Danish blue cheese on whole wheat bread? That's one of my all-time ... never had one here in Taiwan, though. The Danish blue and organic peanut butter are impossible to get down south.

Except for the blue cheese bit, I've heard of these. It seems many people like them.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
I think the difference is that the hamburger has the ... something else is at work here perhaps the bun.

Why is a "beef patty" essential to a hamburger? When my wife makes hamburgers, and when a decent restaurant makes hamburgers, a chuck of ground meat is taken and pressed into a flattish shape. There is no pre-existing patty involved.

Since there never has been a pre-existing patty, it is a moot point.
When a fast food emporium makes a hamburger, they take a pre-made portion control amount of ground meat-like substance and cook it.

Someone or some machine made that patty it makes no difference who or where or at what moment.
Are you saying that my wife's hamburgers are not hamburgers, and not sandwiches, because they don't start life as a patty?

You're over your head even on patties.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
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Charles Riggs wrote, in part:

I think, again, that we need to pin down which ... things, I'd think: crackers and all types of junk food;

I used to enjoy peanut butter and potato chip sandwiches. I suspect I still would enjoy them, come to think of it. I'll do some research.

Do, but I claim neither peanut butter nor potato chips qualify as junk food. Potatoes are very good for you and so are peanuts. Too much fat for some, but since they have a good deal of nutritive value you can't classify them along with liquorice sticks and jelly beans.
potato slices, perhaps; chocolate...

Nutella can be in a sandwich. But is Nutella chocolate?

I've never seen the stuff.
True, but some sandwiches that are undeniably sandwiches are rarely, ... slice a pita bread sandwich with hummus inside, for one.

I always slice my hamburgers, as otherwise it is too difficult to keep the proper meat:bun ratio towards the end. (No, I don't have an overbite.)

I understand the importance of such ratios, one reason I never like a waitress to add more coffee to a partially-filled cup I'd been drinking from. I explained this to one of them and she clearly thought I was nuts, but who wants to go to the effort of getting the milk:sugar:coffee ratios exactly right an unnecessary number of times?

With a burger, I just throw away the end part of the bun that contains no portion of a patty, or any onions, or any lettuce, when that happens. I must admit it is rare though since I try to distribute these ingredients throughout the bun, and I am reasonably careful not to let all of them slip to the eaten end while eating. Hollowing out the bun, as I invariably do, makes that much easier to accomplish compared with eating a restaurant burger with an unmodified bun.
Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Just a few general comments...
People who work in the industry at management level, for MacDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's and so on, term it the 'specialty sandwich business'.
Some restaurants serve 'hot hamburger sandwiches' and 'hot chicken sandwiches' which consist of the named meats between two slices of bread on a plate and soused with gravy. Meant to be eaten with a knife and fork, not in the hand.
There are places serving something called 'loose meat sandwiches', something I've never encountered personally and would like to hear more details about.
In all cases, the common denominator seems to be the presence of bread and meat on the same plate.
Just a few general comments... People who work in the industry at management level, for MacDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's and ... about. In all cases, the common denominator seems to be the presence of bread and meat on the same plate.

MCDonalds call their burgers 'sandwiches' but then they also call their eateries 'restaurants'.
DC
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Django Cat filted:
MCDonalds call their burgers 'sandwiches' but then they also call their eateries 'restaurants'.

Actually, they call them "stores"...in any event, the relevance to sandwichness is hazy at best..r
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