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What is the real difference between "think of" and "think about" (Introducing a Verb Clause?

Can we say

I thought of going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind?

And what's the difference with:

I thought about going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind. ?

Besides, can we say:

I'm thinking of/about his committing suicide. ?

I'm thinking of/about them doing that. ?

Finally, What's the usage of "think to" followed by an infinitive?

Can we say:

I'm thinking to go there next weekend. ?

And what about:

I thought to go there the following weekend. ?

What's the difference between

I thought to go on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind.

And

I thought of going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind. ?

Besides, can we say

I'm thinking to it

I'm thinking to the news.

And what the meaning is supposed to be?

Thanks
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What is the real difference between "think of" and "think about" (Introducing a Verb Clause?

what does verb clause mean?
I have not heard of it.


Can we say

I thought of going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind
I thought about going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind.

When I think about something I am more obsessed with an idea than when I think of something.
I ususally think of something as a possibility, or if I think of something then it crosses my mind.


Besides, can we say:

I'm thinking of/about his committing suicide. Yes

I'm thinking of/about them doing that. or their, which is more formal

Finally, What's the usage of "think to" followed by an infinitive?

Can we say:

I'm thinking to go there next weekend. No.

And what about:

I thought to go there the following weekend. I did not forget to go.


I thought to go on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind. You did not forget about the arrangements of your holidays, but you changed your mind

And

I thought of going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind. Ok

We use think plus infinitive when we are remembering to do something or have a good sense to do something.
I thought to close the windows before I went out.


Besides, can we say

I'm thinking to it You have an idea in your mind but you do not speak about it to anyone.

I'm thinking to the news. Probably you have a secret nobody knows and you are contemplating sharing it with soebody.

And what the meaning is supposed to be?

You are expected to do something as a type of obligation.

Thanks
First of all, I don't use think to. You may hear it, but I don't recommend using it.

think of: bring to mind; call to mind; come up with (especially not be able to think of a reason)

I couldn't think of any reason why the students should not be allowed to attend that concert. (not think about)
I don't know what to do about this problem, but I'll think of something. (not think about)

think about: reflect upon; review images in the mind; muse

I was thinking about what happened to Jerry yesterday. (think of might work here as well.)

think of or think about: consider

I thought of/about going on holiday in September, but I'm not sure yet where I'll go.


A good dictionary would help you even more. You should think of/about getting one!

CJ
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Inchoateknowledge, You said:

I'm thinking to it You have an idea in your mind but you do not speak about it to anyone.

I'm thinking to the news. Probably you have a secret nobody knows and you are contemplating sharing it with soebody.

Can you give me a definition and a clearer explanation about think to + noun?

Besides, what my dictionary says about think to is:

1 tr. (foll. by to + infin.) intend or expect (thinks to deceive us).

2 tr. (foll. by to + infin.) remember (did not think to lock the door)

Can you explain sthg more about the meaning "intend or expect" ? Is there also any dialectal usage of think to + inf.?

Thx very much
In sentences like:
I'm thinking about/of his committing suicide
I'm thinking about/of them resigning
I'm thinking about/of Jill's having dinner with him

and so on, is there a real difference between the usage of "think about"(to me this is more correct in the vast majority of the cases) and "think of".
Is there any sentence in which should be better using "think of" instead of "think about"?

Thx very much
Matar0
In sentences like:
I'm thinking about/of his committing suicide
I'm thinking about/of them resigning
I'm thinking about/of Jill's having dinner with him

Thx very much

and so on, is there a real difference between the usage of "think about"(to me this is more correct in the vast majority of the cases) and "think of".

Yes, the difference could be slight for example:

"I'm thinking about his committing suicide." could mean I am recollecting the event or what would happen in the case of event

"I'm thinking of his committing suicide." could mean I am becoming aware that he might commit suicide, or I've just remembered that he might do that

Is there any sentence in which should be better using "think of" instead of "think about"?

There is no better use "of" instead of "about", you use one or another depending on the context and your intention. Sometimes they are interchangeable, sometimes they are not.

For example you say:

"I can't think of doing anything better." (meaning: there is no better way I can recall at this moment how to respond) but you do not often say "I can't think about doing anything better."

"think about" is used with the meaning: to have ideas and images, to remember, to consider

"think of" is used with the meanings: to have an idea of particular person or thing, to create idea, to remember (usually with can), to consider from certain perspective
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Perhaps you can post less questions in a single message.
Easier to focus.
Matar0


What is the real difference between "think of" and "think about" (Introducing a Verb Clause?

Can we say

I thought of going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind?

And what's the difference with:

I thought about going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind. ?

Besides, can we say:

I'm thinking of/about his committing suicide. ?

I'm thinking of/about them doing that. ?

Finally, What's the usage of "think to" followed by an infinitive?

Can we say:

I'm thinking to go there next weekend. ?

And what about:

I thought to go there the following weekend. ?

What's the difference between

I thought to go on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind.

And

I thought of going on holiday last weekend but then I changed my mind. ?

Besides, can we say

I'm thinking to it

I'm thinking to the news.

And what the meaning is supposed to be?

Thanks


Here are a few more examples:

Mary mentioned to me about her trip to and she asked me if I am interested. I am thinking about it. (not of) -- You are considering it

When Mary mentioned to me about her trip to , I thought of the beautiful beaches and tropical sun. You recalled the images of the sun and beaches.

When you apply the phrases on a person, then the meaning is nearly identical.

I am thinking of you / I am thinking about you – Both mean I am recalling everything of you.

If you say: I just thought of something. You are saying, that something just came to mind.

If I said: I thought about taking a class on accounting at night before. I implied it was only a conceived idea but I didn’t come through with it
i learn in my book that we can't use fourth form of verb with think in continous tense.
My classfellow said that "iam thinking about you" is the absoutely wrong,"i think about you" is the right.
how
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