+0
Hi,

A: I cannot but think that he is still alive.

B: I cannot but think of his being still alive.

****

A and B has the same meaning? To me it sounds like that A is of the meaning, "I happen to keep thinking that he is still alive" and B is of, "The fact that he is still alive makes me keep thinking about the fact".

The difference is, in A, the speaker is not sure if he is still alive but feels like so, but in B, the speaker knows for fact that he is still alive, and the very fact he is alive makes the speaker keep thinking.

Am I right or wrong?

C: So far from poverty being a misfortune, it may be converted into a blessing.

***

Is this grammatically correct sentence? The writer wants to say that poverty can be turned into a blessing.
+0
pructusAm I right or wrong?
Right. I would phrase it a little differently, but you're right.

A. I can't prevent myself from [believing / hoping] that he [is still / may still be] alive.
B. I can't prevent myself from thinking about the fact that he is still alive.
pructusC: So far from poverty being a misfortune, it may be converted into a blessing. ...
Is this grammatically correct sentence?
Yes, though it sounds as if it were written in the 1800's.

CJ
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks a lot, CalifJim!!

Could you rephrase or rewrite the sentence C?

I'd like to know how you would rewrite it....
I was afraid you would ask that. Emotion: smile

So far from poverty being a misfortune, it may be converted into a blessing.
=

Poverty is far from being a misfortune. In fact, it may be converted into a blessing.

CJ
Thanks so much, CalifJim....
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.