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I had a Japanese lesson earlier, and the teacher used 2 words which when translated came off as "think" and "recollect". Do you see them as opposites or can they have similar meanings? Being a native speaker, I am not sure if I am used to hearing them used in similar situations (being wrongly used), or if it is correct. Here are some examples of how I see the words used:

1. I think that movie was boring. (SUBJECTIVE: Here, think is used for stating an opinion, and it is very different than recollect. "I recollect that movie was boring" isn't correct.)

2. I think I will go to the store in an hour. (FUTURE EVENT: Here, think is used when planning to do something which is probable but not yet certain)

3. They have to think of a name for their new baby. (MAKE/CREATE: Here, think is used in the process of brainstorming, either in making (think of a name), deciding, or problem solving (think of an easier way to...)

4. Can you think of a time when you.... (PAST EVENT: Here, think carries the meaning of "remember")

The activity we were working on was answering a question, which I initially translate in English as, "Since coming to Japan, can you recollect any problems you have had?" In English, the "think" or "recollect" part of the sentence is dropped to give a more direct, "What problems have you had, if any, since coming to Japan?"

To the Japanese teacher, she said think and recollect were opposites. I don't really agree though. I am curious what others "think".
Comments  
I certainly don't see how they could be thought of as opposites.
The sentence in question seems to me to be more fluently rendered as

Can you think of any problems you have had since coming to Japan?

At any rate, since recollect can substitute for think of here, they are not opposites in this sentence.

CJ
I think the teacher was looking at it like a time based thing. You think of new stuff, like a baby's name, whereas if we already met and you forgot my name, you might try to remember it (not think it). However, going back to the initial question as I understand it, there is not much difference if any when using either word.
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Well as it was a Japanese lesson, how they are used in English is not relevant. Perhaps they are the nearest translations of two words that ARE opposite concepts in Japanese.
If you are an English speaker, you do use English though when learning (example: this is the word for blue, circle, tree, etc...). It's natural to understand the context by translating, especially if you don't know new vocabulary.

I would think opposite concepts are opposite, regardless which language they are in.
To me, to “think” is to reflect an opinion. To recollect is to retrace from memory. Being an Asian myself, I have come across many half-full- and-half empty translations in publications. In some ways, they are similar words but can not replace each other in a given context. But they are in no way opposite.
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WwwdotcomI think the teacher was looking at it like a time based thing. You think of new stuff, like a baby's name, whereas if we already met and you forgot my name, you might try to remember it (not think it). However, going back to the initial question as I understand it, there is not much difference if any when using either word.
Hello W3.com

I was born as a native speaker of Japanese, and so I can guess why the teacher insisted "think" and "recollect" are opposite in the sense. Most of Japanese learners of English understand "think" is English counterpart of Japanese "kangaeru" whose principal meaning is "use the mind to make one's decision or judgment for some future event". On the other hand, "recollect" is translated into "omoidasu", which is used to mean "recall any past event from memory". Actually, however, we also use "kangaeru" in the sense of "recollect". "Watashi wa tokidoki shinda haha no koto wo kangaeru". "I often think of my dead mother".

paco