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1) thinking above the curve = ?

2) over-logic = super logic?

Context:

I have heard it called 'thinking above the curve'. And it's that; I have heard it called the 'over-logic', and it's that too. Whatever you call it, ...
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Comments  
NL888I have heard it called 'thinking above the curve'. And it's that; I have heard it called the 'over-logic', and it's that too. Whatever you call it,
There's nothing in the context you've supplied that tells us what it is. I get the impression, in fact, that the author is about to tell us what it is just at the point where you stopped quoting the text.
In any case the expressions in single quotes are simply different names for whatever it is. The text itself defines the terms (later, I suspect).
Compare:
I've heard it called a 'mibulact', and I've heard it called a 'tulaqualog', and I've heard it called a 'sixtuballic phremostat', but to me it's simply a triangle.
CJ
Thanks CJ. More context below:

At one moment I had none of this; at the next I had all of it. If there is any one thing I love about writing more than the rest, it's that sudden flash of insight when you see how everything connects. I have heard it called "thinking above the curve," and it's that; I've heard it called "the over-logic," and it's that, too. Whatover you call it, I write my page or two of notes in a frenzy of excitement and spent the next two or three days turning my solution over in my mnd, looking for flaws and holes(also working out the actual narrative flow, which involved two supporting characters placing a bomb in a major character's closet), but that was mostly out of a sense of this-is-too-good-to-be-true unbelief. Too good or not, I knew it was true at the moment of revelation: that bomb in Nick Andros's closet was ging to solve all my narrative problems. It did, too. The rest of the book ran itself off in nine weeks.
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Hi, would anyone like to reply this?
As the writer explains, those are some terms for a flash of inspiration he gets as an author. Read the whole paragraph again - the paragraph is telling you about an experience he has as an author. He has heard that experience referred to by those two phrases.
Thank you.

Would anyone like to explain what is the "curve" there? And does "over-logic" mean "get over logic?"
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The curve is the curve (which is usually a bell in shape) representing the statistical distribution of similar events.
Above the curve means above the (statistical) average/median, above the habitual/usual/normal.
According to C.A.Jones, this expression was coined by Stephen King and indicates a particular kind of creative writing.
Here's the link to her book "The Way of Story: The Craft And Soul of Writing " (page 128).
Forget about King, this exists for more than 100 years in statistics ... The only problem is that your authors don't know math and think it's been invented in their field.
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