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Hi

I was writing an email to a friend when stumbled upon here. Could you please tell me if “all this” and “this all” are synonymous here?

I feel so much better having shared all this with you.
I feel so much better having shared this all with you.

Many thanks in advance,

Tom
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Comments  
The first sentence is correct. All is an adjective and "this" is a pronoun.
You can also say " I feel so much better having shared all of this with you."
In this sentence, both "all" and "this" are pronouns.
You can also omit "all" and keep the same meaning, but with less emphasis..
Hi Tom

In my opinion, both versions are acceptable and in common use.

You might be interested in comparing the use of "all" in these sentences:

- All (of) the neighbors knew what had happened. (The omission of "of" would sound more informal to me.)
- All of them knew what had happened. (I generally would not omit "of" here, however "all this" sounds OK.)
- The neighbors all knew what had happened.
- They all knew what had happened.

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Hi Yankee:
The only examples that I can find using "this all with" are a couple of set phrases, where "all" is an adverb meaning entirely, or completely.
  1. He takes this all with a grain of salt.
  2. You're doing this all with one hand tied behind your back.
To me, the more natural phrasing is "share all this with you"
Your other examples are good, but different syntax patterns
Hi AlpheccaStars

I'd probably be more likely to use "all this" as well, but I definitely would not rule out the other version. To me, "this all" should be viewed as a unit -- not "this all with". Thus, we basically have "share X with you", where X = "this all".

Did you check COCA for examples of "this all"? I've taken a peek, and judging by the first page of results, usage of "this all" (similar to Tom's second sentence, but not necessarily followed by "with") seems to be decently represented.

Possibly it's something that is more commonly used in some places than in others.
HI Yankee:
I did the search on "this all with" on COCA, and only had 9 results, including the set phrases. Then I did "all this with" and got 114 results, including a sentence almost exactly like the poster's

I shared all this with Mary, and she said she'd like to tell what happened,
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Hi AlpheccaStars

I've agreed with you that "all this" would probably be the more common wording for Tom's particular sentence, however I can't see ruling out "this all". To argue that "this all (with)" is only used occasionally with set phrases doesn't make sense to me, either. Yes, "take (something) with a grain of salt" is set idiom, but "this all" is not part of that "set" phrase. In fact, wouldn't you agree that more often than not you'll probably just see the word "it" used there? Still, it is possible to use plenty of other words there too -- even though some of those are bound to be more commonly used than others.

I don't view the very standard collocation "share (something) with someone" as being so fundamentally different from e.g. "take (something) with a grain ..." as to rule out the use of "this all" instead of "all this" -- especially in view of the fact that "this all" is in common use. I think that last point is something we agree on, right?

At the gut reaction level, Tom's second sentence simply did not cause me to think "No, that one's wrong". That's why I suggested that possibly there might be some regional differences at work here.
Mr. TomI was writing an email to a friend when stumbled upon here. Could you please tell me if “all this” and “this all” are synonymous here?
I feel so much better having shared all this with you.
I feel so much better having shared this all with you.

Hi Tom. Happy New Year!
No Tom. "all this" and "this all" are not synonymous. Not here nor anywhere else.

The tricky thing about these phrases, is that the two words included are both adjectives and pronouns.
So, it's just a matter of taste, and not a case of grammatical conflict.

I feel so much better having shared all this with you.
I feel so much better having shared this all with you.
(adjective ) (pronoun ) (prepositional phrase)

By the way. The prepositional phrase, starting with "with", is irrelevant in this analysis.

Kindly. TIM.

Hi Tim

As Tom used them, I would consider the two phrases to be synonymous.
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