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(1) This is the last time I have lent you money.

(2) This is the last time I am lending you money.

(3) This is the last time I will lend you money.

I am not sure when to use which tense of "lend". Please help me. Thank you very much.

Comments  
ansonguy(1) This is the last time I have lent you money.

This is not possible without a time machine or a molecular duplicator a la Star Trek. "Have lent" places the event firmly in the past, so "this" does not work. Maybe "That was the last time I lent you money.", which means that I never lent you money from that time until now.

ansonguy(2) This is the last time I am lending you money.

This is possible using the present to denote future intention. It means the same thing as (3).

ansonguy(3) This is the last time I will lend you money.

This is the clearest and the standard way of saying that I will never lend you money again after this time.

ansonguy

(1) This is the last time I have lent you money. No, even grammatically ok, but semantically flawed.

(2) This is the last time I am lending you (the/ any) money. Improved as edited.

(3) This is the last time I will lend you (the/ any) money. Improved as edited.

I am not sure when to use which tense of "lend". Please help me. Thank you very much.

Both 2, AND 3 are correct (as edited). You need a determiner before "money", The present continuous is used in the future so semantically, both carry the same weight in meaning.

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anonymousYou need a determiner before "money",

Not in my US dialect, and I daresay in US English.