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Hi!


I'd like to know if both are correct in English.

If yes, which one is more popular in writing and which one is more colloquial.


This is the reason that...

This is the reason why...


Thanks!

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raudis

Hi!


I'd like to know if both are correct in English.

If yes, which one is more popular in writing and which one is more colloquial.


This is the reason that...

This is the reason why...

HI, raudis. Welcome to EF.

They are both correct. "This is the reason why..." is more common in both written and spoken English than "This is the reason that..."

As far as I know, there isn't a meaningful difference in frequency of usage in written and spoken English.

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If yes, which one is more popular in writing and which one is more colloquial.


This is the reason that... Fine

You can also say 'This is why . . . '

This is the reason why... More informal. Some people feel this is substandard English.

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CliveThis is the reason that...

Often the subordinator can be omitted.

This is the reason that he works so hard.
This is the reason he works so hard.

CliveThis is the reason why.

Some sticklers consider this to be unacceptable ( ungrammatical ) in formal writing even though it is commonly used in written material.


https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=the+reason+that%2Cthe+reason+why&year_start=1960&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cthe%20reason%20that%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20reason%20why%3B%2Cc0

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CliveThis is the reason why.

Some sticklers consider this to be unacceptable ( ungrammatical ) in formal writing even though it is commonly used in written material.

I have never heard of such a thing.

The objectionable phrase is The reason is because (for The reason is that). This has nothing to do with the reason why.

If anyone can quote a source that says 'reason why' is objectionable (and explains the reason why Emotion: wink), please tell me about it, preferably with a link.

CJ

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CalifJimIf anyone can quote a source that says 'reason why' is objectionable (and explains the reason why ), please tell me about it, preferably with a link.

Here's one: https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/reason

However:

  • Oxford Learners and Cambridge Learners both give example sentences with "reason why".
  • Neither Fowler nor Partridge seem to object to "reason why" (though Fowler mentions "reason that" as an example of a correct form).
  • COCA, GloWbE, BNC, COHA, NGrams and SkELL all indicate that "reason why" is more common, and appears to have been so for (at least) the past 200 years.

I wonder if the objection to "reason why" was raised by one of those cranky grammarians who complain about prepositions at the end of a sentence (and split infinitives).

Thanks, Blue Jay!

At least lexico says it's generally accepted in standard English

(ending the sentence without a period as shown above — I guess you can't have everything).

Blue JayI wonder if the objection to "reason why" was raised by one of those cranky grammarians who complain about prepositions at the end of a sentence

I doubt it. I think we're dealing here with a separate group of cranks.

Blue Jay(and split infinitives).

Surely not! Who would complain about that?

CJ