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I'm reading a a passage in an LSAT review book and I came across this sentence:

"In the process, constitutional protections generally accorded an adult offender were not applied to proceedings involving a minor."

Is this sentence grammatically correct? There is something about the word "were" that doesn't sound right...

and it seems like the sentence would sound better if it were stated like this:

In the process, constitutional protections generally accorded [WITH] an adult

offender were not applied to proceedings involving a minor.
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Hi,

I'm reading a a passage in an LSAT review book and I came across this sentence:

"In the process, constitutional protections generally accorded an adult offender were not applied to proceedings involving a minor."

Is this sentence grammatically correct? There is something about the word "were" that doesn't sound right... Sounds fine to me. The subject is the plural 'protections', not the word 'offender'.

and it seems like the sentence would sound better if it were stated like this:

In the process, constitutional protections generally accorded [WITH] an adult

offender were not applied to proceedings involving a minor.

I think the word 'accord' is causing you confusion. 'Accord' here is a transitive verb meaning 'grant (to)'.

Here's the idea.

"In the process, constitutional protections ( that were generally granted (to) an adult offender ) were not applied to proceedings involving a minor."

The verb form 'accord with' has another meaning that is not intended here.

A accords with B means that A is in agreement with B.

Clive

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I still am slightly confused...

there must be a preposition in the phrase "generally accorded an adult offender". The word "accorded" is the preposition, right?

Thanks!
-Jon
Hi,

I still am slightly confused...

there must be a preposition in the phrase "generally accorded to an adult offender".

The word "accorded" is the preposition, right?

No, 'accord' is a past participle describing 'protections'.

ie protections ( that were generally granted (to) an adult offender )

The preposition 'to' is optional.

Conside these simpler examples using the verb 'accord'.

The university accorded Tom a degree.

The university accorded a degree to Tom.

A degree was accorded Tom by the university.

A degree was accorded to Tom by the university.

ie The university gave Tom a degree.

Clive