+0
What kind of difference do you native speakers feel there is between
those people who are interested in English


and
people who are interested in English


?
1 2
Comments  
Hi! Taka,

Not given enough context, I think "those who" is somewhat emphatic to my ear.

Blacknomi
Its almost pointless to try to interpret something like this without context - but that usually doesn't stop me! I could suggest two possible differences:

1) "Those people who..." sounds a little more formal - its trying harder to sound important.

2)To me, the sentence starting with "those" indicates that maybe the speaker is going to draw a distinction: "Those people who are interested in English are modern and practical; those who are interested in French are hopeless romantics" or something like that. Or, he could be drawing the distinction between "those people who..." and himself, distancing himself and perhaps passing a judgement on "those people."

THIS IS PURELY INTUITION. It says more about how my mind works than what the words themselves mean. Regarding out-of-context language, I had an interesting conversation just yesterday with my husband, involving another thread from this board:

Me: How would you interpret this sentence?
Husband: It would depend on the context.
Me: What if there were no context?
Husband: Then there would be no need to interpret the sentence.

As much as I enjoy the out-of-context challenges on this board, I must admit he has a point - if the language is being used to communicate, there will be other clues to its intended meaning. If its not, there's not that much point trying to discover its inherent meaning.

Now I'll argue with the point I just made - sometimes there is a gap between the intended meaning and the perceived meaning. In that case, is there not some value to seeking an inherent meaning? I really don't know the answer - anyone else want to follow this diversion?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
To Khoff,
How about these sentences,

a) "I detest PEOPLE WHO spit on the streets and detest even more, THOSE (PEOPLE) WHO do so arrogantly!"

b) "I try to help PEOPLE WHO are interested in English and encourage THOSE (PEOPLE) who study English diligently."
Hi, khoff!

I know that context is super important. That's why I'm asking about the 'feel' of 'those people who' and 'people who'; I'm not asking for the interpretation.

Say, when you hear 'We need people who are ready, and able, to lead us into a more prosperous future.' and 'We need those people who are ready, and able, to lead us into a more prosperous future.' without context, what kind of difference-however subtle it might be- do you 'feel' at first?

That is my question.
Wow! Blacknomi! Long time, no see!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
/// Say, when you hear 'We need people who are ready, and able, to lead us into a more prosperous future.' and 'We need those people who are ready, and able, to lead us into a more prosperous future.' /// (How do you put the quote in those nice blue boxes, anyway?)

Okay, Taka, here is my totally intuitive reaction to these two sentences - In the first sentence, it sounds like it might just be "wishful thinking" -- we need people like this, but we don't even know if such people exist! In the second sentence, it sounds as if the speaker assumes that "those people ..." are out there somewhere, and we are talking about them, and saying that we need them.

Note that in this context, my reaction was quite different than it was with your first pair of phrases, where I felt that "those people" was drawing a contrast between "those people" and other people, or between the speaker himself and "those people" with who he did not want to be identified.

-khoff
Blue boxes – and more:

Now you can turn all your posts beet-green-green, khoff!

MrP
khoff.
here is my totally intuitive reaction to these two sentences


Great! The reason I join this wonderful EnglishForward.com is because I need analysises with native speekers' feel of the language; I'm not here for the dry, inhuman stuff. I have enough of it here in Japan. Emotion: smile

Thank you. Indeed, your comments are very interesting.

Now, MrP.

Could I also have your smart analysis with your feel, the usual, nice one?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more