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Even though he has a great potential to complete the task, he still can't work on the task because he has not been selected to work on this task.

Though he he has all the things that are needed to serve the people whom he meet, he still need to need to add some more things to his basket to serve efficiently.

Although she has the some beautiful clothes to wear, but she still need some accessories in order to get a great look.

Even though he has the money to give to them, he still can't offer it to anyone until he gets the permission from his senior.

Though he was not interested do that activity, he still managed to take part in it.

Can we write the sentences like above that has Though, Even though, Although followed by still? If yes do we need to use all the time or is there any context in which we shouldn't use still?

Whats the difference between though and Even though or Although?

Please help me understand the concept.

Thanks,
Comments  
As far as I can think, "though", "even though" and "although" are interchangeable in meaning when they occur at the start of a sentence. There may be usage differences however; for example, "though" is not used much in that position in conversational English. Whichever you choose, "still" is optional. If used it adds emphasis.

Only "though" can be used at the end of a sentence (e.g. "I tried hard. It's no use though.").

If you search Google for difference between though and although you will find lots of hits, including previous discussions at this forum.

There are many errors throughout your sentences, though these are not directly relevant to your question.

PS: I also just noticed that "even though" does not fit well mid-sentence in cases like the sentence immediately above.
GPYThere are many errors throughout your sentences
Could you please help to rectify my mistakes, here are sentences again with some modifications.

Even though he has a great potential to complete the task, he still can't work on the task because he has not been selected to work on the task.

Though he has lots of fruits in his basket to serve the people whom he meet on his way, he still can't because the permission to has not been granted yet.

Although she has some beautiful clothes to wear, she still need some accessories to look great.

Even though he has the money to give to them, he still can't offer it to anyone until he gets the permission from his senior.

Though he was not interested to do that activity, he still managed to take part in it.

Thanks
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Even though he has a great potential to complete the task, he still can't work on the task because he has not been selected to work on the task. — This is correct English but it feels quite repetitive. I think you can just say Even though he has a great potential to complete the task, he still can't work on it because he has not been selected.

Though he has lots of fruit in his basket to serve the people whom he meets on his way, he still can't because the permission to do so has not been granted yet. — "to serve the people whom he meets on his way" may not be the most natural way to express this, but I would need to know more about the exact context.

Although she has some beautiful clothes to wear, she still needs some accessories to look great.

Even though he has the money to give to them, he still can't offer it to anyone until he gets permission from his boss.

Though he was not interested in (doing) that activity, he still managed to take part in it.
GPYThough he has lots of fruit in his basket to serve the people whom he meets on his way, he still can't because the permission to do so has not been granted yet
GPY "to serve the people whom he meets on his way" may not be the most natural way to express this, but I would need to know more about the exact context.
It's just a sentence that came to my mind, what are the other ways to write this sentence to make it sound more natural?
Wonder123It's just a sentence that came to my mind, what are the other ways to write this sentence to make it sound more natural?
I need to understand more about the situation you have in mind. Who is this person? Where is he? What is he doing? Who is going to give him permission?
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GPYI need to understand more about the situation you have in mind. Who is this person? Where is he? What is he doing? Who is going to give him permission?
He is a fruit serving person and he need to serve the fruits he has in his basket to the individuals whom he meets on the way as he walks but only after getting the permission from his owner.
People don't normally wander around the streets "serving" fruit to people they bump into. Possibly you mean he is selling fruit? Also, people do not have "owners" (unless they are slaves). You could perhaps say:

He has lots of fruit in his basket to sell to passers-by, but he can't start selling it yet because his boss hasn't given him permission.