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First, the fact has been given that the "weather" is an uncountable noun and my question is "How the sentences below can have the "the" in front of the "weather?" Is that because the context or the flow of the sentence makes the placement of the "the" necessary?

How is the weather? The weather is fine.

Secondly, which of the following sentence is right? They are all trying to say the same thing.

1) Please say "Hi" when you see me.

2) Please say Hi when you see me.

3) Please say Hi when you see me.

Thirdly, can I replace the underlined phrase into "a large number"? If so, how can we know when to use the two phrases, "a large number" and "large numbers of ," properly in a given situation?

Ex.

New York City and Los Angeles City are two very popular big cities in the U.S.. Large numbers of people love to visit these cities for travel and sightseeing.
Comments  
how is the wheather good sounds me and without the is a little weird.

also don't say secondly and thirdly, writing of them are second and third.

your second question, both are correct it is about perspective.

when you see me, please say hi

when you see me, say hi please

which one you choose.
Thank you, can you answer the third question please?
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exactly i can't. what do you mean when you use large numbers of or a large number.

as far as i understood, most people love to visit these cities for travel and sightseeing.

Did i understand correct?
Hi guys,

First, the fact has been given that the "weather" is an uncountable noun and my question is "How the sentences below can have the "the" in front of the "weather?" Is that because the context or the flow of the sentence makes the placement of the "the" necessary?

How is the weather? The weather is fine.

You seem to think that an uncountable noun can never be preceded by 'the'. It can. eg a bak robber says 'Give me the money'.

It depends on whether you want to speak generally or specifiically. eg

Weather is an interesting topic. (general reference)

The weather in London today is fine. (specific reference)

Secondly, which of the following sentence is right? They are all trying to say the same thing.

1) Please say "Hi" when you see me.

2) Please say Hi when you see me.

3) Please say Hi when you see me.

For formal writing, you need quotes.

Thirdly, can I replace the underlined phrase into "a large number"? If so, how can we know when to use the two phrases, "a large number" and "large numbers of ," properly in a given situation? These expressons are very similar. 'Large numbers of' suggests, to me, a bit more emphasis on big numbers.

Ex.New York City and Los Angeles City are two very popular big cities in the U.S.. Large numbers of people love to visit these cities for travel and sightseeing.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you so much.

Can it be like this?

The weather in London today is fine -- making a specific reference.

The weather is fine -- making an implicitly understood specific reference. (there is no need for a restrictive clause "in London" because the speaker and the listener have an understanding that the weather they are talking about is "that" weather as to be, alike in its implication to the rules for articles for countable nouns.)
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Hi,

Yes, that's it.

Clive