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First, the dictionary says that the "deal" is also a pronoun and had this example. Please help me to understand how the word "deal" can be a pronoun in the sentence.

Although he had never met Geoffrey Hardcastle, he knew a great deal about him.

Secondly, I know in most cases, short thrown-in remarks can function without non-essential structural elements like articles but what about rather long reamarks like the one below. Does the sentence below seem to be stretching the grammatical patience too far to the side of "unacceptability"?

Great way of putting it!

Thirdly, can you tell me what this sentence is saying? To me, if a statement is true, that's enough and there is no need to qualify, embellish, or magnify it.

You say in a manner of speaking to indicate that what you have just said is true, but not absolutely or exactly true.
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Hi,

First, the dictionary says that the "deal" is also a pronoun and had this example. Please help me to understand how the word "deal" can be a pronoun in the sentence.

Although he had never met Geoffrey Hardcastle, he knew a great deal about him.

It's a noun, not a pronoun. My dictionary agrees with me.

Secondly, I know in most cases, short thrown-in remarks can function without non-essential structural elements like articles but what about rather long reamarks like the one below. Does the sentence below seem to be stretching the grammatical patience too far to the side of "unacceptability"?

Great way of putting it! Sounds fine.

Thirdly, can you tell me what this sentence is saying? To me, if a statement is true, that's enough and there is no need to qualify, embellish, or magnify it.

You say in a manner of speaking to indicate that what you have just said is true, but not absolutely or exactly true

in a manner of speaking is an inserted phrase. The main thought is 'You say. . . to indicate', but this is not grammatical, and has no real meaning. It doesn't specify what you say.

It's true that truth should ideally be considered absolute, but in human relationships we often play with the truth, we deal in partial truth. Do you always tell the complete truth every time you speak? Assuming you are male, if your wife shows you her new dress and it's horrible, what will you say when she says 'I'm so happy with my new dress, do you like it?'

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you.

When you wrote, "Do you always tell the complete truth every time you speak?," I think it is safe to assume you are using the "truth" as an uncountable noun.

My question is "How can you arbitrarily put the "the" in front of the "truth"? Is that because the context or the flow of the sentence seem to necessitate the use of the "the" like saying "Bring me the water."
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Hi,

It's because I was specifically referring to the complete truth rather than the incomplete truth or the partial truth.

Best wishes again, Clive
Thank you.

Were you using the "truth" as an uncountable noun?
Hi,

Maybe yes, maybe no. I think yes. Sometimes it's not easy to decide.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you very much

My Q: How can you arbitrarily put the "the" in front of the "truth"?

Your A: "It's because I was specifically referring to the complete truth, rather than the incomplete truth or the partial truth."

My Q now: Do you think the "the" should be placed there regardless whether the word "truth" is an uncountable or a countable?
Hi,

If it's countable, you need an article. Otherwise, it depends on whether you are speaking generally or specifically.

You mightbe interested in these quotations:

In the Bible, PontiusPilate asks Jesus a famous question: Pilate said to Him, "What is truth?"

In court, the usual oath by a witness is: I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi,

I was looking pretty close at the statement "If it's countable, you need an article. Otherwise, it depends on whether you are speaking generally or specifically."

OK, I think, if you want to think an uncountable noun in indiviual terms, wouldn't it be more appropriate to use "a" rather than "the." In my knowledge, "a" in front of an uncounble nouns gives or indicates the notion of it being "a kind of something"; thus, if you want to think it in distinctive parts, maybe "a" would be appropriate, but you used "the" and want to know why? Thank you.
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