+0
Hi. A happy new year. I wish your new year to be a healthy and prosperous one.

I was watching a good, ole TV sitcom "Three's Company" till a moment ago. The title "Three's Company" means Jack, Janet, and Chrissy's company, right? But at the end of the lyrics it keeps saying three's company too. How would you intrepret it in connection to the parts immediately before the words? I don't get it.

Thanks in advance.

Come and knock on our door.....
We've been waiting for you......
Where the kisses are hers and hers and his,
Three's company too.

Come and dance on on our floor......
Take a step that is new.....
We've a loveable space that needs your face,
Three's company too.

You'll see that life is a frolic and laughter is calling for you......
Down at our rendez-vous,
Three's company, too!!!!!!
Comments  
This is a reference to the old adage: Two's company, three's a crowd.
Thanks, rvw. Now what does that mean?

Hiro/Sendai, Japan
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
"Two's company" means that if there are just two people, they provide companionship or fellowship for each other. But if a third person joins them, the comfortable intimacy that the two people had is shattered. What was a friendly pair becomes a "crowd".

To say that "three's company too" is to argue that three people can have the comfortable intimacy characteristic of a pair.

PS
I hope you don't judge all Americans by our television programs.
I've just done a little research myself, and gotten the gist of it. Correct me if I'm wrong. The adage tells you that lovers want to be alone, saying two is good but three is too much. But in this situation comedy Jack, Janet, and Chrissy lead a happy life, with a lot of laughter --- three's not a crowd, it's good company too.

"Three's company" somehow makes me reminisce my good ole senior year in high school in Southern Indiana; it was run nights from different stations.

Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
Hi, rvw.

It looks like I put up my last post before I read yours. No worries, I went to U.S. high school partway, and U.S. college partway, and worked there too. I don't judge, but take it as what it is like the culture I'm in now.

Thank you for your help, rvw. Very informative.

Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.