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I was watching raindrops falling from the sky, through the big wind of my house.

I was watching raindrop falling, through the window.

If I remove the comma from the above sentence does will make sense differently to the readers?
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Comments  
You don't need the commas; each clause needs a verb.
What very should I add?
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Wonder123I was watching raindrops falling from the sky, through the big wind of my house.
Is the person watching the raindrops falling from the sky or raindrops falling through the window or over the window?
Wonder123I was watching raindrop falling, through the window.
Same question as above.
Wonder123 Wonder123I was watching raindrops falling from the sky, through the big wind of my house.Is the person watching the raindrops falling from the sky or raindrops falling through the window or over the window?Wonder123I was watching raindrop falling, through the window.Same question as above.
Raindrops don't fall through a window, so you're OK.
Wonder123If I remove the comma ...
The ambiguity you're struggling with is this:

I was watching the rain falling through the open window.

This can mean several things.

1. (most likely) The rain was coming through the window. If you were standing close enough, you were getting wet.
2. The rain was not coming through the window. You were just watching it by looking through the window.
3. (very unlikely) You were falling through the open window as you were watching the rain.

As is quite usual in these cases, there is very little you can do with commas (or any other kind of punctuation) that will remove the ambiguity. It's surprising how many sentences just happen to be ambiguous. Changing the phrasing is usually the best solution.

CJ
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CalifJimThe ambiguity you're struggling with is this:
You exactly pointed out what I'm looking for, like you mentioned in 1 and 2 yes it creates two different meaning. How can I make sense to the reader exactly what I mean, when it is case 1 and when it is case 2? please help.
Wonder123How can I make sense to the reader exactly what I mean
Well, one thing is certain. You can't use that ambiguous sentence. Emotion: smile

I was watching the rain falling through the open window.

1. The rain was coming through the window. If you were standing close enough, you were getting wet.

Write: I noticed that the rain was coming (in) through the open window.

2. The rain was not coming through the window. You were just watching it by looking through the window.

Write: Looking out the open window, I saw that it was raining.

CJ
Ok so my sentences may confuse the readers, right? like whether the character is looking the rain fall through the window or looking the rain water that is flowing through the window.
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