I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw her.
(P.Cornwell)
This is a sentence from a novel.
My question is about ' throw her',
How is this phrase is related to 'wouldn't trust her'?

Is this an idiom?
Very funny expression.
It must mean that I wouldn't trust her at all.
I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw her. (P.Cornwell) This is a sentence from a novel. My ... 'wouldn't trust her'? Is this an idiom? Very funny expression. It must mean that I wouldn't trust her at all.

Yup. An AV search on "as far as I could throw" throws up 14,000 hits, so it's a very common expression also.
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=85213&dict=CALD

Adrian
"Masa" >
It must mean that I wouldn't trust her at all.

You are correct in your guess.
People are difficult to throw very far. It is a common saying where I come from.{USA}
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I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw her. (P.Cornwell) This is a sentence from a novel. My question is about ' throw her', How is this phrase is related to 'wouldn't trust her'? Is this an idiom? Very funny expression.

It's a cliché so unless you can inject some extra something, no, it isn't funny.

"He's asking if you killed Freddie Miles and then killed Dickie Greenleaf."
"No, I did not kill Freddie Miles and then kill Dickie Greenleaf." -, "The Talented Mr Ripley"
I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw ... 'wouldn't trust her'? Is this an idiom? Very funny expression.

It's a cliché so unless you can inject some extra something, no, it isn't funny.

You can't find a cliché funny? That's equivalent to saying you can't laugh at the same joke twice, but people do it all the time. Most slapstick humour, for example, depends on that response; there are only so many ways a pie can be thrown in someone's face, not that I personally find that funny, but many people seem to.

In any case, 'I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw her' is funny to the not humour-deprived (Hi, Raymond).
I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw her. (P.Cornwell) This is a sentence from a novel. My ... 'wouldn't trust her'? Is this an idiom? Very funny expression. It must mean that I wouldn't trust her at all.

Well, yes. But in the absence of any context, I can't rule out the possibility that you have encountered "throw" in the sense "confuse" or "disconcert." Take a look at
, definition 5.

Bob Lieblich
Don't try to throw me
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I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw ... 'wouldn't trust her'? Is this an idiom? Very funny expression.

It's a cliché so unless you can inject some extra something, no, it isn't funny.

The variant "I wouldn't trust her as far as I can throw a grand piano" has also become a cliché.

Robin
I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw ... It must mean that I wouldn't trust her at all.

Well, yes. But in the absence of any context, I can't rule out the possibility that you have encountered "throw" in the sense "confuse" or "disconcert." Take a look at , definition 5.

But the context is "trust her as far as I could throw her". Which has never had anything to do with confusion. "Throw" on its own could be confusion, definitely, but not when used with "trust".
It's a cliché so unless you can inject some extra something, no, it isn't funny.

You can't find a cliché funny? That's equivalent to saying you can't laugh at the same joke twice, but people do it all the time.

The way to find a cliché funny is to add in that something extra I was talking about.
Most slapstick humour, for example, depends on that response; there are only so many ways a pie can be thrown ... case, 'I wouldn't trust her as far as I could throw her' is funny to the not humour-deprived (Hi, Raymond).

It isn't funny in isolation because it's just a cliché. Said about Kate Moss, there's potential. Again, something extra, added to the cliché can make it work for you.

"What do you value in your bulldogs? Gripping, is it not? It's their nature? It's why you breed them? It's so with men. I will not give in because I oppose it. Not my pride, not my spleen, nor any other of my appetites, but *I* do. Is there in the midst of all this muscle no single sinew that serves no appetite of Norfolk's but is just Norfolk? Give that some exercise. Because, as you stand, you'll go before your Maker ill-conditioned. He'll think that somewhere along your pedigree, a *** got over the wall."
-, "A Man For All Seasons"
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