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If you are not on top of your game, you need to know where your off stump is and that's what the lads will be working on. You need to learn when to leave the ball, and when to play it late and underneath yourself.
We have fierce competition for places in the middle order now, and Eoin Morgan has thrown his hat squarely into the ring for the Ashes. You could almost imagine the team that beat Pakistan at Trent Bridge starting the first Ashes Test in Brisbane.

Morgan batted really well under pressure in the first Test, came in at a difficult time and saw himself through to a hundred. He showed great character, and proved his unorthodox 'one-day' style can be equally effective in the long game.

Please explain to me the highlighted parts.

Source : http://cricket.yahoo.com/cricket/blog/grahamthorpe/256/256grahamthorpe
Comments  
The standard expression is "throw one's hat into the ring", which means to declare one's intention of competing for some position, job, role, political office, etc. "squarely" here means decisively, forcefully.
Thank you.
But I wonder what they mean by at the end of the phrase "for the Australians". Do they mean "Morgan looking forward to be included in the Australian team"?
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User_garyBut I wonder what they mean by at the end of the phrase "for the Australians".
I don't see "for the Australians" anywhere in the text you posted. "Morgan has thrown his hat squarely into the ring for the Ashes" means that he hopes to be considered for the Ashes team, or has made a good case to be so considered.
Thank you Wordy.

Ashes means Australians
User_garyThank you Wordy.

Ashes means Australians
No, "The Ashes" is the name of the series of matches between England and Australia.

The text you posted says that "Eoin Morgan has thrown his hat squarely into the ring for the Ashes." I don't follow cricket closely, but I gather that Eoin Morgan hopes to play in the Ashes for England, so there is all the difference in the world between "for the Ashes" and "for the Australians".
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Thanks a lot again Mr. Wordy. I understood it now.