+0
Which of these two sentences is correct:

"Today is Thursday"

or

"Today it's Thursday"?

Are they both correct?

And what about "It's Thursday today"?

And if I want to ask you a question, should I say

"Is today Thursday?" (but it doesn't sound very well to me)

or

"Is it Thursday today?" ?

Thank you very much for your answers.
+0
'Today is Thursday.'
'Is today Thursday?'
'It's Thursday today.'
'Is it Thursday today?'
'It's Thursday today, isn't it?'
'Today's not Thursday, is it?'

All of these roll trippingly off my tongue, but 'today it's Thursday' does not. This sentence seems unnatural, but I can offer no reason except usage. My apologies.
+0
"Today is Thursday."

You don't need to use the pronoun "it" in that sentence because "today" is used as a noun in it (not as an adverb). Using "it" would be redundant, since "today" is the subject of the sentence. You don't need another subject.

In "today's my birthday", "today" is a noun.
In "I'm going shopping today", "today" is an adverb.

Miriam
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
It's very clear. Many thanks for your answers.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

In my humble opinion, "Today is Thursday" is syntactically perfect, Today functioning as a subject / noun; and "Today it's Thursday is fine, too, with Thursday taking on the role of an adverb. This is confirmed by the fact that it passes the native speaker test (see above).

anonymousToday it's Thursday is fine, too,

Nope. It would be if it wasn't shriekingly unidiomatic.

anonymouswith Thursday taking on the role of an adverb.

Wrong, again. It would be a predicate adjective if the sentence was possible.

anonymousThis is confirmed by the fact that it passes the native speaker test (see above).

I cannot see that above.