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Scenario 1: I have been with this company for a year now and I haven't gotten a review yet. When you're hired, you should get one after three months. And I say:

1. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more to make up for the loss of my review that I should've gotten after three months of working here. (Is this sentence okay?)

I'm confused with which tense I should use. How do I express the 'three months' ?

2. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after the 3 months that I worked here.

3. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after the 3 months that I had worked here.

4. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after the 3 months that I have worked here.

Scenario 2: Sammy buys a new bike in the summer and amy asks her why she didn't get it in the winter time and she says:

(It is still summer time.)

5. I didn't want to wait. Even if I had waited, driving my van till chirstmas would've made up the differrence because of gas. (Is 'would've' correct here? Or should I use 'would' ? Why?)

6. Sammy buys a new bike in the summer and amy asks her why she didn't get it in the winter time and she says: (Is 'didn't' correct here? Or should it be 'doesn't' ? I should stick with one tense when telling stories right unless it is necessary to switch over? In this case, is it necessary to switch over?)

Thanks.
Comments  
Sorry for the tiresome questions but could someone help me out with the one above? Thanks.
Scenario #1 - I 'd say you would have to be quite sure that you would have been given a raise after three months, if they had done the review, before you say any of these things! It sounds like you still haven't had the review and so you still don't know if they want to give you a raise at all, much less retroactively. From a grammar point of view, sentence 1 is okay, or you could say "after my first three months on the job."

For sentence 5, I'd go with "would make up the difference."

For sentence 6, since "buys" and "asks" are in present tense I would use "doesn't" in present also, but I'm less usre of this one - let's see what other peope say.
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Hello Jack

Here are some amendments:

1. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more to make up for the fact that my review is late.

2. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after 3 months.

3. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after working here for 3 months.

4. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after the first 3 months I worked here.

5. I didn't want to wait. Even if I had waited, driving my van till Christmas would've cost just as much because of the extra gas.

6. Sammy buys a new bike in the summer and Amy asks her why she didn't get it in the winter time, and Sammy says 'mind your own goddam business'.

MrP
5. I didn't want to wait. Even if I had waited, driving my van till Christmas would've cost just as much because of the extra gas.
5. I didn't want to wait. Even if I had waited, driving my van till Christmas would've cost just as much because of the extra gas. (How come 'would've' is okay here? Why not 'would' ? It's summer right now and I just bought my bike last week, so should I use 'would' or 'would've' ? I'm confused. Christmas hasn't even passed by yet and I can use 'would've' ?)

Thanks.
Hello Jack

It's because the imaginary period would have started in the past, from the speaker's point of view, and continued till Christmas:

X..........................................X............................................X

period starts now Christmas

MrP
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4. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after the first 3 months I worked here.
4. I think you should bump my raise a little bit more because I should have gotten a review after the first 3 months I have worked here.(Is it wrong with 'have' here? Why is that?)

Thanks.
Hello Jack

'I have worked here' relates to the entire period of work at that place. But in this sentence, the speaker is only referring to a part of that period: the first three months.

MrP