A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about the middle of the column:
"Unfortunately, with the limited resources and the great number of high-priority items and emergencies, the lightbulbs are not replaced as timely as the customer desires."
My question is about this usage of "timely."
Were I writing that sentence, it would end with "the light are not replaced in as timely a manner as the customer desires."

Comments?

"Time" and "tide" have three things in common. (Two if capitalization matters.)
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A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about the middle of the column: "Unfortunately, with the limited ... that sentence, it would end with "the light are not replaced in as timely a manner as the customer desires."

(shakes head sadly): That should be ..."the light bulbs are not..." (My spellchecker does not like "lightbulbs." I said to Ignore it the first time, but foolishly clicked on "Change" the second time.)
Maria Conlon wrote on 08 Apr 2005:
A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about the middle of the column: "Unfortunately, with the limited ... sentence, it would end with "the light are not replaced in as timely a manner as the customer desires." Comments?

"Quickly". "Timely is an adjective in my verbal database, but W3NID says it's an adverb too and gives these examples:
1 archaic : EARLY, SOON he did command me to call timely on himShakespeare

2 : in time : OPPORTUNELY, SEASONABLY the present action was timelybrought within two years after his appointment R.W.Starr

So the usage has a timely imprimatur.

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A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about the middle of the column: "Unfortunately, with the limited ... sentence, it would end with "the light are not replaced in as timely a manner as the customer desires." Comments?

Almost feels as though it should be "timelyly" in the original.
dg (domain=ccwebster)
A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about ... in as timely a manner as the customer desires." Comments?

Almost feels as though it should be "timelyly" in the original.

In RightPondia we'd say "promptly". "Tinely" in the sense of "prompt" is not part of standard BrE (nor is "tardy" in the AmE school sense of being late for a lesson (??class).
Alan Jones
A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about ... in as timely a manner as the customer desires." Comments?

Almost feels as though it should be "timelyly" in the original.

I felt that the amenation was just more of that AUE "Draconian Justice" stuff.
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In RightPondia we'd say "promptly". "Tinely" in the sense of "prompt" is not part of standard BrE (nor is "tardy" in the AmE school sense of being late for a lesson (??class). Alan Jones

You from Mirthy Titville, wot?
Maria Conlon wrote on 08 Apr 2005:

A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about ... in as timely a manner as the customer desires." Comments?

"Quickly". "Timely is an adjective in my verbal database, but W3NID says it's an adverb too and gives these examples: ... the present action was timely brought within two years after his appointment R.W.Starr So the usage has a timely imprimatur.

And it smells like 'imprimatur'. Go with Maria, folks. Even if you are a left-footer.
A quote from the San Francisco Chronicle, at about the middle of the column: "Unfortunately, with the limited ... that sentence, it would end with "the light are not replaced in as timely a manner as the customer desires."

If I had to use 'timely' I'd write it as you would. But I'd prefer to use 'promptly'.
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