During my recent visit to the US (I am not a native English speaker) I heard several times different people saying something like /tInI/. From the context I initially guessed that it was a pronunciation variant of a word "tiny" (as in "tiny bit"). However, after looking in Longman Pronunciation Dictionary I found out that this word has only one, conventional pronunciation - /taInI/.
So, was it indeed a work "tiny", or there's some other word with the described pronunciation and the meaning similar to "tiny"?
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During my recent visit to the US (I am not a native English speaker) I heard several times different people ... it indeed a work "tiny", or there's some other word with the described pronunciation and the meaning similar to "tiny"?

I think you heard "teeny", which is a variant often associated with nursery speech, or adult speech to children, or in euphemistic or sarcastic use. You also hear the variant form "teensy", and "teeny-weeny" which means "very tiny."
"Would you like a slice of cheesecake?"
"Yes, please, but only a teensy one, because it is so very good."
"I'm the teeny-weensiest bit annoyed with you (since you cuckolded me)."
I think you heard "teeny", which is a variant often associated with nursery speech, or adult speech to children, or in euphemistic or sarcastic use. You also hear the variant form "teensy", and "teeny-weeny" which means "very tiny."

Thanks, this must be it!
It's really hard for me to learn the language where different sounds may be distinguished just be their lengths.
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I think you heard "teeny", which is a variant often ... the variant form "teensy", and "teeny-weeny" which means "very tiny."

Thanks, this must be it! It's really hard for me to learn the language where different sounds may be distinguished just be their lengths.

Consider yourself lucky you're not trying to learn Mandarin.

Mike Nitabach
I think you heard "teeny", which is a variant often ... the variant form "teensy", and "teeny-weeny" which means "very tiny."

Thanks, this must be it!

Well, not all of it. The song about the spider crawling up the water spout (downspout from the eavestrough, (also called the gutter)) describes the spider as "eensy weensy spider", a variant upon "teensy weensy" (and I have heard it pronounced as "intsy wintsy spider". Of course my little sisters learned it as "itsy bitsy", itself a variant of "itty bitty" from "little bit".)
It's really hard for me to learn the language where different sounds may be distinguished just be their lengths.

Keep in mind that many of these variations are baby talk. "Nursery Speech, or "adults speaking to children", as Father Ig says. They are part of the culture, and context sensitive, but you wouldn't be expected to use this subdialect.
The song about the spider crawling up the water spout (downspout from the eavestrough, (also called the gutter)) describes the ... spider". Of course my little sisters learned it as "itsy bitsy", itself a variant of "itty bitty" from "little bit".)

"Incy wincy", in my day in BrE.

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
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The song about the spider crawling up the water spout ... bitsy", itself a variant of "itty bitty" from "little bit".)

"Incy wincy", in my day in BrE.

"Incey wincey", chez Lyle. I have a suspicion that we also accorded him, her, or it an introductory "The". And there were the obligatory actions, too, of course.

Mike.
The song about the spider crawling up the water spout ... bitsy", itself a variant of "itty bitty" from "little bit".)

"Incy wincy", in my day in BrE.

Goodness, I think this is where I came in. ISTR the other Katy singing it down the phone to me at my first ever boink. Or was that the teapot song?

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
"It was an itsy-bitsy teeny-weeny yellow polka dot bikini, that she wore for the first time today..."

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire, England
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