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Could you tell me the difference between title and entitle?

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The verb "title" is, in contemporary English, used much more frequently than "entitle" with the same meaning (to name a work of art, literature, video, and other production.), especially when the author or creator is named or known..

The winner within, as Riley titled his recent book, was a big loser this season.
The painting, then titled The Alchemist, was originally attributed to Jan Steen.
On 12 September 2006 Frampton released an instrumental work titled Fingerprints.

A video of the revelry was entitled Gay Scandal and distributed around the city. (We do not know who invented the title.)
He produced an informative television series entitled Costumes Through the Ages.


Entitle is mostly used with a completely different meaning:

A hunting license shall entitle the holder to hunt, pursue and kill wild birds and wild animals, except wild deer and bear, in a legal manner, when and where it is lawful.
The COVID relief act entitles families making less than $50,000 annually, a one-time payment of $1200.
Anyone who has an issue with Mr. Kelly is certainly entitled to their opinion.
If a train is cancelled and you cannot travel you are entitled to a full refund.

Comments  
Nhật BìnhCould you tell me the difference between title and entitle?

This is a nitpicker's bone of contention, if you'll excuse the mixed metaphor. The dictionaries tell you all you need to know, and you should make your own decision. I use "titled" for the verb meaning "having the title of". The latest citation in the OED for "entitled" in that sense is from 1793, but very few people read the OED, more's the pity. You hear both, but "title" is more "correct".

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you.

I see.

Title and entitle can be interchangeable (when they mean to give a name to a book, a play,...), but entitle is less commonly used than title.

Nhật BìnhTitled and entitled can be interchangeable (when they mean to give a name to a book, a play,...), but entitle is less commonly used than title.

I suggest that in your writing, use "titled" and forget "entitled". When you read something, you can expect to see "entitled" occasionally.

The relative frequency was likely different in the distant past (hundreds of years ago).

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