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Hi, What does it mean "having"? I don't understand this word when it is written as a verb

To what state refer "alied army" in the context? maybe it is only a term and not refer to a country?

"The Soviet Union had depicted America likewise so their ‘friendship’ during the war was simply the result of having a mutual enemy - Nazi Germany. In fact, one of America’s leading generals, Patton, stated that he felt that the Allied army should unite with what was left of the Wehrmacht in 1945, utilise the military genius that existed within it (such as the V2’s etc.) and fight the oncoming Soviet Red Army."
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Flowersa I don't understand this word when it is written as a verb
It's not a finite verb in this example, but the meaning is the same as if it were -- "to possess."

We have the same enemy. We had a common enemy.

I have an upset stomach as the result of having pizza for lunch.

I'd say "having" in these examples is a gerund (verbal serving as noun), acting as object of the preposition "of."
(The whole gerundive phrase acts as object of the preposition in both cases.)
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Hi Avangi, thanks a lot that was very helpful Emotion: smile
FlowersaTo what state refer "alied army" in the context?
Sorry, I missed that.

In WWII the two opposing sides were the "Allied powers" and the "Axis powers."
The "Allied Army" would be the combined forces of GB, US, France, Canada (I'm sure I'm leaving someone out!. Sorry.) Emotion: embarrassed
Hi Avangi, I confused with the way soviet russian was called with this "allied powerts" but now it is all clear thanks again for your help Emotion: smile
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Wow! Soviet Russia fought with the Allies in WWII. Sorry about that! (I knew I was missing somebody!) Emotion: embarrassed

The comment ". . . . and fight the oncoming Soviet Red Army" is a little strange.
As I recall, Eisenhower made Patton pull back so the Soviets could be the first into Berlin.