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Hi,
I'd like some opinions on these sentences. Where should I put "also"? Consider that splitting invinitives doesn't bother me at all, I don't care what's "considered" correct, I'd like to know what "sounds" good and what "sounds" best.

They tried to get me to do it also on Saturdays. No way!
They tried to get me to also do it on Saturdays. No way!

Since I know that "I also have one in my room" is way better than "I have one also in my room", then I was wondering if the second one was better.
Thank you in advance. Emotion: smile
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I may get blasted for sayiung this but I'll take my chances. Emotion: big smile

To me, [also] along with othe adverbs can be inserted in different part of a sentence, depending on the context. the writer has to decide which works best in a given context.

Consider these sentences:

"Do you have a PC also in your room?"

"I also have a PC in my room"

"Paul has a PC in his room also"
Hi Benny... Goodman

I like your I may get blastedEmotion: smile. You need not fear that. May I offer my semi-sincere apologies to all those Britishers/Britons/Brits (take your pick!) who may have been offended by my previous remarks in this thread. Emotion: smile We all knowalso can be placed in various places, the most common of them -- universally accepted, I think -- are:

1. The same place adverbs of frequency take: I also wanted to go there. He has also written a letter. She would also have been given something.

2. The end of a clause: I wanted to go there also. (As far as I know, not much used in BrE.)

3. The beginning of a clause, to modify more than one word -- often a whole clause: Also, I was too tired to do anything except go to bed.

The 'trouble' is the fact that also is not automatically placed before the word it qualifies. If it were, there would be less room for misunderstandings.

There is a word that is at least theoretically placed where it belongs in English: even. Examples:
Even he bought a ticket.
He even bought a ticket.
He bought even a ticket.

However, natives don't always put it in the 'right' place. I assume it is due to their being used to the strangest word orders with other words. When they encounter a word that for some mysterious reason can be placed where it belongs, and yet the sentence sounds more or less 'natural', they get confused and hastily say the word as soon as it is possible. Emotion: smile
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Hi Cool Breeze,
you are right, but I have to disagree on "even" (sorry CB, anyway I think we are already used to disagree with each other, aren't we? Emotion: stick out tongue) It is a little more fexible than "also" but, like "also", it doesn't only modifiy the word it's next to. So "He bought even a ticket" is not natural at all in my opinion, and it would always be "He even bought a ticket" (and then you stress what you want to stress).
I think that an adverb that often modifies the word next to itself might be "exactly"... Emotion: smile
Another question on ALSO.

(1) I have a cat. I also have a dog and also have an elephant. Emotion: smile
So can I say 'I also have a dog and an elephant.' ? (2)

Does one 'also' stress both dog and elephant in (2)?
or should I say it in two sentences conjuncted with 'and'(1), not only conjuncting objects of the sentences as in (2) ?
SunFlowerSeed(1) I have a cat. I also have a dog and also have an elephant. Emotion: smile
So can I say 'I also have a dog and an elephant.' ? (2) Yes, and that's way better in my opinion

Does one 'also' stress both dog and elephant in (2)?
or should I say it in two sentences conjuncted with 'and'(1), not only conjuncting objects of the sentences as in (2) ?
I also have a dog and an elephant
I also have a dog, and also an elephant
I also have a dog, and an elephant too
Those are ok in my opinion, you don't need to repeat the verb.

That's what I think, maybe someone else has something to add. Emotion: smile
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