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Hello!

Please, taking a look at my sentences can you see any mistake?

- I was advanced; however I missed the bus anyway.

- We got some water in spite of the drought.

- They’ll help her out as soon as she gets abroad.

- You’ll consider me for working as a parking lot attendant as soon as I give you my curriculum vitae.
- I became an instructor after I had practiced kick-boxing.

- I assisted the old lady after she had wheeled herself around.

Thank you,
Jim
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Comments  
AnonymousYou can/will be able to consider me for working as a parking lot's attendant as soon as I give you my curriculum vitae.
Others seem fine to me.
Thanks Fandorim!

Best wishes,
Jim
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Hi
I was advanced early .........

You'll consider me for (work as a parking lot attendant) / (the position of parking lot attendant) as soon as I give you my curriculum vita.
I became an instructor after becoming proficient in kick-boxing.
- I assisted the old lady after she had wheeled herself around. - This sounds very strange, what do you mean exactly?
Hi,Optilang

Many thanks for your corrections.But I didn't understand what you tried to show me in:

"You'll consider me for (work as a parking lot attendant) / (the position of parking lot attendant) as soon as I give you my curriculum vita."

Hello Jim
And by the way why isn't correct to write "curriculum vitae" , but "curriculum vita"?
Apologies for vita - it was a typing error and should be vitae!
The old lady fell after she had wheeled herself around. Is it okay now, isn't it? Do I have to write fell down? Is it necessary and correct?
The old lady fell (out of the chair) after she had wheeled herself around.
Finally in: "I became an instructor after I had practiced kick-boxing" as I also would like to use the past perfect tense and the word "after", is it right (following your answer) if I say: "I became an instructor after I had become proficient in kick-boxing" ? By the way would have another way of saying it without repeating the verb to become twice?
I became an instructor after I had learned kick-boxing.
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Hi, Optilang

Thanks for all your help up till now. Sorry to insist, but is my sentence below correct? Because you put some parts into brackets so, I'm not sure if it is wrong or not.

Here it is what I wrote: "You'll consider me for working as a parking lot attendant as soon as I give you my curriculum vitae"

This was your comment with some parts into brackets:

"You'll consider me for (work as a parking lot attendant) / (the position of parking lot attendant) as soon as I give you my curriculum vita."
Hi Jim
People are considered for work, not for working, that is why I changed the sentence. The parts in brackets are 2 options for you to choose, either will be OK. So it means that there are 2 possible sentences:
either
"You'll consider me for work as a parking lot attendant as soon as I give you my curriculum vitae."
or
"You'll consider me for the position of parking lot attendant as soon as I give you my curriculum vitae."
Hope all's clear now.
Hi,Optilang

Now I noticed what you were trying to tell me. Thank you! But I have a last question,please. You told me that people are considered for work, not for working. I've learned that after prepositions the verbs take the "ing" form. e.g.: Thanks for coming,
after listening, etc...So in this case,is it an exception to the rule?

Many thanks again,
Jim
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