+0
Hi all

What does 'to be or not to be' mean?

Thank you.

Ernest
Comments  
Shall I remain alive or shall I kill myself?

CJ
Thank you, Calif Jim.

So 'to be or not to be' only means 'shall I remain alive or shall I kill myself ?' , am I correct? Or that is only an example.

Thanks again. Emotion: wink

Ernest
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
The original is from Shakespeare's Hamlet. What CJ explained is what Hamlet meant when he said it in the play. But it's become such a famous expression that it is sometimes applied to other situations.
Thank you for your help, Grammer Geek.

I would really appreciate if you could provide me with some situations where you would use this expression. So I would be able to use it at the right time.(should it be 'in the right time'?) Emotion: stick out tongue

Thanks again for your help.Emotion: big smile

Cheers,

Ernest
Well, my advice would be to not try to use it untill really understand it. Usually, it's used jokingly.

Like, someone says "I'd like to come, but I don't know if I can be there." And you say "To be there, or not to be there, that is the question." It's a joking reference to the original. It wouldn't sound natural if you had to plan when you would say it - it should just pop out.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I think I know a bit more about this expression now.Emotion: stick out tongue Thank you for you adivce, Grammer Geek.

Thanks again.

Ernest