Hi,

I am beginner in learning english, i am lalways confused with the use of this passive form "to be + past participle"(eg;to be decided,to be counted).kindly give me whole idea about the usage & why, where we can use this form etc.dont forget to explain this with a relevant example

kindly explain the mean difference of these sentence as well,

sam's faith to be decided today in the court

sam's faith will be decided today in the court

thanks in advance
vts nairsam's faith to be decided today in the court
sam's faith will be decided today in the court
A newspaper headline:
Sam's fate to be decided today in the court

A declarative sentence:

Sam's fate will be decided today in the court.

(His "fate" = what will happen to him.)
i am lalways confused with the use of this passive form "to be + past participle -- Then you should start by carefully reading about it [url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv65.shtml ]HERE[/url] and [url=http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/passive.htm ]HERE[/url].

Sam's fate is to be decided today in the court
Sam's fate will be decided today in the court

These are two ways of expressing future facts. The first is more formal and less used.
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vts nairto be decided,to be counted
As you illustrate yourself in your last two examples, it's often related to the future, but a variety of paraphrases is possible, depending on context.

... fate is to be decided = ... fate will be decided

is to be counted = will be counted; is going to be counted; should be counted; ...

is to be seen = will be seen; is going to be seen; should be seen; ...

In newspaper headlines the is is often omitted so that

Sam's fate is to be decided becomes Sam's fate to be decided in the headline.

CJ
Thanks very much CJ,

But still have couple of doubts,

Can i mostly use all these form(will be,should be) instead of "is to be" in a sentence? if not, kindly give some examples with each one.
CalifJim
vts nairto be decided,to be counted
As you illustrate yourself in your last two examples, it's often related to the future, but a variety of paraphrases is possible, depending on context.

... fate is to be decided = ... fate will be decided
is to be counted = will be counted; is going to be counted; should be counted; ...
is to be seen = will be seen; is going to be seen; should be seen; ...

In newspaper headlines the is is often omitted so that

Sam's fate is to be decided becomes Sam's fate to be decided in the headline.

CJ
AnonymousCan i mostly use all these form(will be,should be) instead of "is to be" in a sentence?
No. You need to paraphrase is to + verb according to the meaning of the entire sentence. I was merely suggesting some of the approximate meanings of that structure. For example, depending on the sentence, is to go can mean is supposed to go, will go, must go, is expected to go, is going to go, or similar phrases that involve the future.

By the way, that structure is used mostly in journalistic and literary contexts. I don't hear people using that structure much in ordinary conversations. You should know the basic meaning of that structure when you see it written, but you probably won't be using it in your own conversations.

CJ
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Our findings are substantiated by recent genomic work indicating the differing outcomes of streptococcal infections "to be based" on the genomic status of the organism.

Can I interpret this construction ("to be based") exactly as "are to be based" or "will be based" or "are supposed to be based" or "are expected to be based". Are there some clue or just the reading of the full document is supposed to give you the answer.

Thanks

Gonzalo
I would interpret it as "are based" or "it is highly likely that they are based"
.. indicating that the differing outcomes of streptococcal infections are based on the genomic status of the organism.