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The government scientific adviser told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show that a level of 2,000 hospital admissions a day was “roughly half what we got to before Christmas with the second wave”.

Is to before Christmas a prepositional phrase with to as its head?

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anonymousIs to before Christmas a prepositional phrase with to as its head?

No. "To get to something" is to arrive at it, literally or figuratively (as here). His turn of phrase is perhaps infelicitous, but extemporaneous speech often is. Hospital admissions "got to" a level that was half of the level that occurred "before Christmas".

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anonymousroughly half of [what we got to] | [before Christmas]

It seems you are parsing it wrong.

'to before' is not a constituent of this phrase. 'to' goes with 'got'.

CJ