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I found this phrase in my Oxford dictionary. It was used in the sentence: "His voice brooks no argument" and means (according to the same dictionary) that judging by the person's voice, he won't tolerate any arguments.

I've asked several people and no one had heard it before.

I was wondering if it is ok to use the phrase in creative writing (I'm writing a story in which I want to use it).

Thank you for help.
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I just heard the phrase in an episode from the TV series "Call the Midwife".

"And I will brook no argument," the nurse tells the usually-unaccepting Sister, upon offering her a car ride.

As in the post before, it means not entertaining any argument.

I find I use it with the word "nonsense" as much as anything else. Btw, chalk file 80, there's no need to hyphenate "usually unaccepting." Don't know how America got into the habit of hyphenating adverbs...

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anonymous

I find I use it with the word "nonsense" as much as anything else. Btw, chalk file 80, there's no need to hyphenate "usually unaccepting." Don't know how America got into the habit of hyphenating adverbs...

I would say I don't know how you got the idea "America" hyphenates adverbs. I'm an American and I've never seen that, until now.

I encountered the phrase: "brook no quarter" in a text published by Alcoholics Anonymous and in that context, it refers to the unconditional demand that the alcoholic must completely abstain from alcohol, with no provision for any libation. It has been proven that this is the only means by which recovery and health can be regained , and those who would continue to partake are offered no shelter here.

I have not heard this exact phrase before but I am fully in favor of using words in ways that carry meaning. What I mean is, inventing a creative way to say something is the joy of being a writer. The words you are suggesting sound correct to me. I’m reminded of the words “I don’t suffer fools gladly” which means “ I speak truth to fools” (even if they’re powerful).

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I would consider who your target reader is. As an older academic I am familiar with the expression. I think my adult college educated daughters would understand the expression. Not sure if younger or less well read folks would get it. Context clues would probably help

More commonly used by pretentious commentators, also, legislate instead of allow and gifted in place of given.

I've found that, as a rule, the longer the thread is, the more bad information it accumulates. About half the posts in this one are wrong. "Brook" is a literary word, well known to anybody who has read anything. It means nothing more than "tolerate" and is idiomatic only where that word would be. It is an ancient Germanic word, and it is similar to "stomach" in connotation.

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When people hAd two strong opposing views one might say to the other “I’ll brook no argument “. It was generally used in a friendly fashion to press a favour upon someone. This phrase is very familiar to me, so English, growing up in the ‘60s.