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Hi,

could you please tell me which is more frequent: "to brush one's teeth" or "to clean one's teath", such as in:

She cleans her teeth every day. / She brushes her teeth every day.

Is there any difference between the two expressions? I mean, does/can the verb clean imply the usage of a tool other than a tootbrush (e.g. dental floss)?

Thanks in advance, as always.
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In the speech of my friends and acquaintances during my entire life I have only heard "brush one's teeth", never "clean one's teeth". (U.S.)

You go to a dentist to have your teeth cleaned once every six months. This is quite an elaborate procedure compared to brushing or flossing one's teeth.

CJ
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No, it's not idiomatic.
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Comments  
CalifJimIn the speech of my friends and acquaintances during my entire life I have only heard "brush one's teeth", never "clean one's teeth". (U.S.)

You go to a dentist to have your teeth cleaned once every six months. This is quite an elaborate procedure compared to brushing or flossing one's teeth.

CJ

Thanks for the answer. To be honest, I've never heard that ("to clean...") myself but I found that in the same textbook for beginners in which I had previously found "on the TV". That's why I decided to ask.
How about "wash"?

Can you say that you wash your teeth three times a day?
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 khoff's reply was promoted to an answer.