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Clive, could you please check this composition? Is it OK as English?

・When we reach a certain age, we cannot help saying bad things about young people, even though we know we shouldn't do it. That is a problem of human nature. It is well-known that an ancient Egyptian criticized the young in the same way in a document. It seems that old people (tend to) feel irritated by the way the young do things until they die.

Thanks in advance.

(Edited by GG to fix original typos since identified by the original poster)
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ha ha very funny... i'm not english guru.. just bumping in!!
When we reach a certain age, we cannot help saying bad things about young people, even though we know we shouldn't do it. That is a problem of human nature. It is well-known that an ancient Egyptian criticized the young in the same way in a document. It seems that old people (tend to) feel irritated by the way the young do things until they die.
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About the parts in red, the original in hand is 'things', 'the young.' When I found the mistake, the post edit permission had already expired (The worst thing of this new version, at least to me. It expires too soon!!)
About the parts you've crossed out, does it mean they are all wrong? Or is it your personal preference? 
Hi
I know you want Clive to take a look at this, but you said it was urgent.
All I have tried to do is to make it sound more natural. Hope it helps. I'm sure Clive will get round to helping you.
The only thing I take exception to is the "until they die." I assume you mean until the old people die, but it's an ambiguous antecedent.

Wasn't it a famous Greek? Are you sure it was an Egyptian?

EDIT: Ah: http://www.bartleby.com/73/195.html
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Grammar GeekThe only thing I take exception to is the "until they die." I assume you mean until the old people die, but it's an ambiguous antecedent.


That's right! It's not clear if it's the young or the old. Thanks, GG!

And thanks for fixing them!
My pleasure. I'm happy to fix typos when they don't relate to the real issue at hand and serve as a distraction.
Grammar GeekWasn't it a famous Greek? Are you sure it was an Egyptian?

EDIT: Ah: http://www.bartleby.com/73/195.html
The original says it was an Egyptian.
Well, since it's human nature, it might have been both, or any old person in the world! 
(Man...it should have been 'Thanks', needless to say...Emotion: crying Could you fix it for me, again? ThankS in advance)
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