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Or can they both be used alike?
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Hello ICU

I would say that when you "die of something", the "something" is the direct cause of death; whereas when you "die from something", the "something" may be the indirect cause of death.

Therefore you usually "die of your wounds", rather than "from your wounds"; but you're as likely to die "from your injuries" as "of your injuries".

However, it's probable that many native speakers use both alike.

MrP
MrPedantic
Hello ICU

I would say that when you "die of something", the "something" is the direct cause of death; whereas when you "die from something", the "something" may be the indirect cause of death.

Then which one would you use, Mr P?

He died of / from cancer. I think, "of".

Google:

"died of cancer" 1.860.000

"died from cancer" 309.000

"died of cancer" site:ac.uk 553

"died from cancer" site:ac.uk 111

Actually Google results support your explanation.

"died from injuries" site:ac.uk 40

"died of injuries" site:ac.uk 17

"died of wounds" site:ac.uk 202

"died from wounds" site:ac.uk 67
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EyeSeeYouOr can they both be used alike?
yes

both of them mean to perish from an injury or a particular disease.
MrPedanticHello ICU

I would say that when you "die of something", the "something" is the direct cause of death; whereas when you "die from something", the "something" may be the indirect cause of death.

Therefore you usually "die of your wounds", rather than "from your wounds"; but you're as likely to die "from your injuries" as "of your injuries".

However, it's probable that many native speakers use both alike.

MrP

Hi, MrP!

And what is the difference between 'wounds' and 'injuries'. I always thought they meant the same.
Die of and suffer from are commonly used.
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DiamondrgThen which one would you use, Mr P?

He died of / from cancer. I think, "of".

Yes, I'd say "died of cancer".

My dictionary lists both "of" and "from" as acceptable prepositions with "die", but unfortunately doesn't provide any notes on usage!

MrP
EyeSeeYouAnd what is the difference between 'wounds' and 'injuries'. I always thought they meant the same.

Hello Eye

A wound implies a piercing of the flesh by some kind of object. A wound is a kind of injury.

So if you cut yourself with a knife, it's both a wound and an injury; if you break your arm, it's an injury, but not a wound.

MrP
MrPedantic My dictionary lists both "of" and "from" as acceptable prepositions with "die", but unfortunately doesn't provide any notes on usage!
One of my E-J dictionaries says there is a tendency as follows:

die of X
when X is an 'internal' or 'direct' cause:
(EX) pneumonia, cancer, cold, malnutrition, hunger

die from X
when X is an 'external' or 'indirect' cause:
(EX) wound, heat, overwork, explosion, inattention

paco
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