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A: Will you force your kids to study hard and become a doctor in the future?

B: To each his own.

Hi,

Does "To each his own" in the above derive from "We should give something to each person based on his own favorites/likings/tastes/talents?" Thanks.
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No, there is no implication of "giving." We should ALLOW the person the opportunity to make his own choice.

Each person will MAKE his own choice. He will not be GIVEN anything.

If we are at a restaurant and you order spicy food and I don't like it, I may say "to each his own" -- there's no implication I will buy your dinner. LIkewise, there is no implication the parent will pay for schooling to become an exotic dancer - only that the child will be allowed to make his own choice.
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The British version is 'each to his own'. Does that take away the impression that permission is being given?

Cambridge learners dictionary

each to his/their own (MAINLY US to each their own)
used to say that everyone likes different things:
You actually like modern jazz, do you? Each to their own.
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Comments  
It means that we should allow each person to choose for himself. The speaker doesn't necessarily "give" what is chosen, but we let the other person decide for himself or herself.
If he wants to be a doctor, that's his choice: to each his own.
PhilipIt means that we should allow each person to choose for himself. The speaker doesn't necessarily "give" what is chosen, but we let the other person decide for himself or herself.
If he wants to be a doctor, that's his choice: to each his own.
Thanks, Philip.

It came to mind that the phrase in question might come from "We should give each person his own choice." Am I off the mark again?
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.