+0
Teeth that are close [to each other/together] should be flossed more regularly.

Are both choices correct and have the same meaning?

Thanks in advance!
+0
Hi Goodman,

Although it's correct grammar, that version doesn't sound idiomatic. Emotion: big smile

Clive
Comments  
New2grammarTeeth that are close [to each other/together] should be flossed more regularly. Sounds Ok

Are both choices correct and have the same meaning?

Thanks in advance!

A modified alternative would be:

Teeth that [which] grow close [to each other/together] should be flossed more regularly.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
CliveHi Goodman,

Although it's correct grammar, that version doesn't sound idiomatic. Emotion: big smile

Clive

Hi Clive,

Do you mean mine, or the original ? If it's my version, may I ask how you would have phrased it? Thanks,
Hi Goodman,

I meant yours.

Teeth that [which] grow close [to each other/together] should be flossed more regularly.

It's the 'grow' that seems unidiomatic in this context.

I'd just say "Teeth (that are) close together should be flossed more regularly".

Best wishes, Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yeah! I was somewhat distracted by the original [teeth that are...] Now that you mentioned it, it does sound "sticky" even to my own ears. Emotion: smile Thanks,