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Arcadian Rises filted:
I believe many other takeoffs keep the original punctuation, e.g. "To err is human, to forgive is devine".

Plunk your magic twanger, Froggie!...
"To err is human, but some people abuse the privilege"..r
"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal". That is, a semi-colon in place of the first ... a case as: "To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is, to say the least, criminal". Right, wrong?

Perhaps what they meant to say was:
To err is human.
To be mauled by spyware is...
... criminal.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
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In article , Joseph Turian at (Email Removed) hath writ:
A full-stop. Because it sounds better, and because the two phrases have little to do with each other.

Except that they are being connected by the speaker. A semicolon shows the intended relationship.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
To err is, human.

This sentence contains two erors.
Regards
Steffen
"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal". That is, a semi-colon in place of the first comma and no second

comma. I prefer comma to the semi-colon in order to keep the flavor of the original: "Errare humanum est, perseverare diabolicum".

Wouldn't that mean something like, to persevere is diabolical? I never heard that.
Why, yes, the Oxford Dict. of English Proverbs gives a number of variations of that, and doesn't give anything with "forgive" until Alexander Pope, 1711. Some examples:
1539 it is naturaly tyue to al men to erre, but to no man to perseuer... therin.
1576 Errare humanum est; in errore perseverare, belluinum.
1578 To offend is humaine, to repent diuine, and to perseuere diuelish.
1596 To erre is proper then to Men, but brutish to persist.

Some give only the "err is human" part. Interesting that the "persevere/diabolical/brutish" one disappears after Pope.

Best Donna Richoux
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"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal". That is, a semi-colon in place of the first comma and no second

comma. I prefer comma to the semi-colon in order to keep the flavor of the original: "Errare humanum est, perseverare diabolicum". I believe many other takeoffs keep the original punctuation, e.g. "To err is human, to forgive is devine".

But the original is more commonly written:
"To err is human: to forgive, divine."
Well, it is by me any way.
Matti
To err is human; to purr, feline.
To err is, human.

This sentence contains two erors.

rec.puzzles is over that way, mate. :-)
btw, what you've quoted isn't a sentence, it's a sig.

Cheers,
Adrian
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comma. I prefer comma to the semi-colon in order to keep the flavor of the original: "Errare humanum est, perseverare diabolicum".

Wouldn't that mean something like, to persevere is diabolical? Inever heard that.

An approximate translation: to err is human, but to persevere (in erring)is diabolical. That's why I prefer the comma to the semi-colon after "human".
Why, yes, the Oxford Dict. of English Proverbs gives a number of variations of that, and doesn't give anything with ... is humaine, to repent diuine, and to perseuerediuelish. 1596 To erre is proper then to Men, but brutish to persist.

Long before those old English Proverbs we find "to err is human..." with variations at the Old Greeks, e.g. Antigona of Sophocles. Then the Romans: Cicero in his 12th Philippica against Antonius: "Cuiusvis hominis est errare. Nullius nisi insipientis, in errare perseverare" (approx: it can happen to any human to err. But only a fool (mad man) perseveres in erring)
in "Controversiae (IV;3) by Seneca: Humanum est errare...etc
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