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On 27 Jan 2005, Skitt wrote Nor to me. I vote for the semi-colonised version.

I don't get all this problematizing of the comma. It's the standard way of punctuating that kind of ellipsis. "My favourite colour is blue; my wife's, red."

What virtue is there, Mike, in following a standard when 'To err is human, to forgive is devine' is fine as it is, whereas 'To err is human; to forgive is devine' jars the eyeballs?
Your example is different for the reason it requires the comma and for the reason it isn't, no offence, poetic.

Charles Riggs
This sentence contains two erors.

rec.puzzles is over that way, mate. :-)

Puzzles are interesting. It puzzles me why they appear to offend you. Lots of off-topic subjects are less enjoyable, pick on those: baby *** and street signs are two, if you need help.
btw, what you've quoted isn't a sentence, it's a sig.

It is most definitely a sentence, plus you need a B. <= There one is.
Cheers, Adrian

You expected your post would cheer someone? Guess again.
Charles Riggs
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I don't get all this problematizing of the comma. It's ... of ellipsis. "My favourite colour is blue; my wife's, red."

What virtue is there, Mike, in following a standard when 'To err is human, to forgive is devine' is fine ... eyeballs? Your example is different for the reason it requires the comma andfor the reason it isn't, no offence, poetic.

But it was poetic. My point is that Pope actually wrote "To err is human, to forgive, divine", as Matti almost said above. (I, too, was in error, since I misremembered that he'd used a semi-colon for the first break.)
With no second "is", the comma is indispensable. With a second "is", it would no longer be a regular line of a heroic couplet.

Mike.
But it was poetic. My point is that Pope actually wrote

Have you got an edition of his works?
"To err is human, to forgive, divine", as Matti almost said above. (I, too, was in error, since I misremembered ... the comma is indispensable. With a second "is", it would no longer be a regular line of a heroic couplet.

As I posted elsethread, two dictionaries of quotations give only one comma: "To err is human, to forgive divine."
Let me haul out the print version of the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations... Ha, they list it your way, with a comma before "divine." So we have a split decision.

Best Donna Richoux
But it was poetic. My point is that Pope actually wrote

Have you got an edition of his works?

Of course I have. You mean you haven't?
"To err is human, to forgive, divine", as Matti almost ... no longer be a regular line of a heroic couplet.

As I posted elsethread, two dictionaries of quotations give onlyone comma: "To err is human, to forgive divine." Let me ... Dictionary of Quotations... Ha, they list it your way, with a comma before "divine." So we have a split decision.

Quit stalling. I'm right, and even that vulgar publication The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations appears to agree with me. How the Hell else could it be punctuated? (Semi-colons and colons apart.)

Mike.
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It may have been mentioned already, but in Bartlett's Quotations there is only the one comma the one after "human".

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Of course I have. You mean you haven't? Quit stalling. ... Hell else could it be punctuated? (Semi-colons and colons apart.)

It may have been mentioned already, but in Bartlett's Quotations there is only the one comma the one after "human".

My copy of the Essay on Criticism has
To err is human; to forgive, divine.
That's the way Truly would have it too, I'm sure.
Let me haul out the print version of the Oxford ... a comma before "divine." So we have a split decision.

Quit stalling. I'm right, and even that vulgar publication The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations appears to agree with me. How the Hell else could it be punctuated? (Semi-colons and colons apart.)

I had to get rid of most of my books when I made this little diversion to the land of shopping centers, The ODOQ being one of them. Which compilation do you recommend? I'll be gradually stocking up after I get a flat in Wexford. Is Bartlett's better, anyone? I used to have a copy of it too, but too long ago for me to remember what it is like.
Charles Riggs
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Quit stalling. I'm right, and even that vulgar publication ... Hell else could it be punctuated? (Semi-colons and colons apart.)

I had to get rid of most of my books when I made this littlediversion to the land of shopping ... anyone? I used to havea copy of it too, but too long ago for me to remember what it islike.

I was jesting about ODQ's "vulgarity", as some of my teachers maintained that dictionaries of quotations were distinctly infra dig. (since we weren't allowed English-Latin or English-Greek dictionaries, either, you may be able to guess the general atmosphere). I'd actually hate to be without mine (I have the 1980 edition). I don't know about the others: probably best to spend a good long time comparing them in the library or the bookshop.

Mike.