"To err is human, to be mauled by Spyware is, criminal".

I came across this phrase on a Windows Experts website today.

It wasn't a speed-writing error as it is used by the author of the phrase as a sig-line.
I can't get my head around the punctuation used :-((

"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal".

That is, a semi-colon in place of the first comma and no second comma.

I would have thought that the second comma could only be there in such a case as:
"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is, to say the least, criminal".
Right, wrong?
(I know Joseph - I don't need my commas for carnaval - but I might just have to leave a note when I dive out very early in the morning ;-)

paulo
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This sentence sucks on many levels.
It's illogical. At best, distributing the spyware is criminal. Accidentally installing the spyware on your own system is your prerogative.
"mauled" is poor diction.
I'm most offended by how unnaturally it reads. The first sentence is punchy, the second sentence is meandering.
"criminal" just ruins the rhythm. Better yet:
"To err is human. To be mauled by Spyware just sucks."

Joseph
This sentence sucks on many levels. It's illogical. At best, distributing the spyware is criminal. Accidentally installing the spyware on ... meandering. "criminal" just ruins the rhythm. Better yet: "To err is human. To be mauled by Spyware just sucks." Joseph

So you would have used a full-stop instead of a semi-colon if you were forced to write this "abominable" phrase?
Serious question. Thanks

paulo
- 8.025 days to carnaval
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This sentence sucks on many levels. It's illogical. At best, ... err is human. To be mauled by Spyware just sucks."

So you would have used a full-stop instead of a semi-colon if you were forced to write this "abominable" phrase? Serious question. Thanks

If a connection or relationship is to be indicated between the two thoughts, a semicolon does that better than a period.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
A full-stop. Because it sounds better, and because the two phrases have little to do with each other.
"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal". That is, a semi-colon in place of the first comma and no secondcomma.

I prefer comma to the semi-colon in order to keep the flavor of the original: "Errare humanum est, perseverare diabolicum".

I believe many other takeoffs keep the original punctuation, e.g. "To err is human, to forgive is devine".
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"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal". That is, a semi-colon in place of the first comma and no secondcomma.

I prefer comma to the semi-colon in order to keep the flavor of the original: "Errare humanum est, perseverare diabolicum".

I believe many other takeoffs keep the original punctuation, e.g. "To err is human, to forgive is divine".
"To err is human; to be mauled by Spyware is criminal".

Right.
Adrian
To err is, human.
I prefer comma to the semi-colon in order to keep ... original punctuation, e.g."To err is human, to forgive is divine".

Ok, then. That fulfills the "say it thrice" requirement. ;-)

Oops, sorry. After I hit "post message" I saw the word "divine" misspelled and I corrected it while the blue bar was still developing its course. I'm new to Google Groups postings, so it will take a while to get used to new tricks. A loong while, according to Mr. Riggs' description of yours truly.
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