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Hi,

I'd like to ask you, is it ok to use the passive voice of the verb "to focus" in this sentence:
All this time John's been focused on blah-blah-blah...

I'm kind of confused about what/who performs the action on John in that case...On the other hand, the following sentence sounds odd:
All this time John's focused on blah-blah-blah...

And Google tells that the Passive voice is the right choice to go with.

Thanks.
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Wrong sense of "Focus."

It's not a the same as "He focused the light projector" or "he focused the camera."

It means "to pay specific attention to someone."

I don't have time to have children - I'm focused on my career right now. (Or: I don't care that my job isn't fulfilling; I'm focusing on my children right now.)

All this time, John has been paying specific attention to...
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Lone SwordsmanLooks like I get the point, but that's very interesting that the sentences with the same subject have practically the same meaning in spite of different (Active/Passive) verb forms.
Indeed. That sometimes happens in English. The context will tell you what is meant:
He drowned in the river. He was drowned in the river.
Both sentences can have the same meaning. The latter one can also mean that a crime was committed. English isn't always the most exact of languages.
CB
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GG, thanks for your reply.

Looks like I get the point, but that's very interesting that the sentences with the same subject have practically the same meaning in spite of different (Active/Passive) verb forms.
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Lone SwordsmanAll this time John's [John has] been focused on blah-blah-blah...
...All this time John's [John is] focused on blah-blah-blah... Passive? No. There's nothing passive here, because there is no agent either implicit or explicit (i.e., there is nobody who is doing something). focused is an adjective. Be careful. Not every word with -ed is a verb in every sentence where it occurs. These two sentences are just the same statement in two different tenses. Note these:

John is ... [present]
John was ... [past]
John will be ... [future]
John has been ... [present perfect]
John had been ... [past perfect]
Complete any of the phrases above by adding any of these:
frightened of snakes, interested in science, focused on his studies, tired of reading, fascinated by insects, bored with grammar.
None of the resulting sentences has a passive construction.
CJ

CalifJim, Cool Breeze thanks for your input.

CalifJim, I had a feeling that "focused" in the first sentence (the second sentence was meant to go like ...John's [John has] focused on...,which is absolutely wrong) was an adjective, not a verb, but I wasn't sure. And your post has removed all doubts about that. Thanks a lot.

P.S. While I was trying to find an agent of the sentence, thinking that the sentence is passive, I had a few mystical experiencesEmotion: big smile))))))))