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There is an opinion that the most common blunder of beginner psychologists is giving advice when nobody ask for it, so called “unsolicited advice”. We have a jocular saying based on a word-play which if I try to translate into English will sound like “Run down the person and force him happy” or “Run down the person and inflict good on him

1) Does it sound ironic or just like a bad English?

2) When I say “run down the person” I mean “run after the person and finally catch up with him”. Is it clear from the context or you’ve got another associations?

3) Is there any fixed expression in English for this situation?
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1) Does it sound ironic or just like a bad English? -- I understand the irony, but it is not good English.

2) When I say “run down the person” I mean “run after the person and finally catch up with him”. Is it clear from the context or you’ve got another associations?-- I have another association: 'run down' also means 'derogate'.

3) Is there any fixed expression in English for this situation?-- I can think of none offhand (unless 'to kill someone with kindness' will do, or better, 'to force something down one's throat'), but I can fix your sentences:

Chase down the patient and force him to be happy.

Chase down the patient and inflict goodness upon him.

Chase down the patient and force happiness down his throat.
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Thank you, Mister Micawber, for fixing my sentences.