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Hi,
I'd like to know how have and its forms are pronounced (in American English), I'm not sure when it's pronounced with a schwa. I'll use the phonetic transcription used by the Merriam-Webster dictionary:
a like in cat
& is the schwa, like the a in about
s like in snake
z like in zebra

Ok, I have no problems (I hope so) when the forms are contracted. I'd like to understand how the forms are pronounced when they are not contracted (/hav/ or /h&v/?). I think it's also important to show which words are stressed in the sentences.

1. I have seen your girlfriend.
2. I haven't seen your girlfriend.
3. I had seen your girlfriend.
4. I hadn't seen your girlfriend.
5. I have a black car.
6. I have to buy a new laptop. (This shoud be /haft&/)
7. I don't have to buy a new laptop.
8. He has to buy a new laptop. (/haz t&/ or /has t&/? And is the t a tapped t, like in "way to go"?)

(Ex. of possible answer: #1 - stress on "seen" - have is /h&v/)

Thank you very much in advance Emotion: smile
Comments  
[ æ ] like in cat
[ @ ] is schwa

1. I have seen... emphasizing have [ hæv ] . Stress on seen: "Have" is actually contracted to just [ v ] : I've seen [ aIv sin ]

2. [ hævn=t ]
3. [ hæd ] . If the sentence were longer, it would probably be contracted to [ d ] .
4. [ hædn=t ]
5. [ hæv ]
6. have to = [ hæ[email protected] ]
7. have to = [ hæ[email protected] ]
8. [ hæz ]
1. I have seen your girlfriend. /hav/
2. I haven't seen your girlfriend. /havint/ /i/ nearly absent.
3. I had seen your girlfriend. /had/
4. I hadn't seen your girlfriend. /hadint/ /i/ nearly absent.
5. I have a black car. /hav/
6. I have to buy a new laptop. (This shoud be /haft&/) yes.
7. I don't have to buy a new laptop. /haft&/ again
8. He has to buy a new laptop. (/haz t&/ or /has t&/? And is the t a tapped t? /hast&/; no, not tapped.

Not contracting auxiliary have is relatively rare in conversation.

CJ
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Thank you so much.
CalifJim Not contracting auxiliary have is relatively rare in conversation.
Yeah, I usually hear contractions, so I've never really paid much attention to non-contracted forms.

Anyway, I see they are all pronounced as /hav/, a like in cat. My dictionaries and Merriam-Webster also list other pronunciations (/h&v/, /h&z/, /h&d/), with the schwa. So when are they pronounced that way?
I think contracted forms can be pronounced either with a schwa or without (/&v/ or /v/, /&z/ or /z/, /&d/ or /d/). But they have no h's, so I wonder when I could hear them with the h's.
So when are they pronounced that way?
Never when I say them!

I think contracted forms can be pronounced either with a schwa or without (/&v/ or /v/, /&z/ or /z/, /&d/ or /d/).
Yes, as you've shown.

But they have no h's, so I wonder when I could hear them with the h's.
I wonder the same thing!

CJ
CalifJimI wonder the same thing!
Oh, well, I won't use those versions too then!
Thanks Emotion: smile
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Good idea.

( ... won't use them eitherthen Emotion: smile )

CJ
CalifJim
( ... won't use them eitherthen Emotion: smile )
Dammit, I really don't know why I keep on making the same mistakes. It must be because I'm still not used to some structures and often I don't feel like paying attention to what I write...

Anyway, thank you for pointing out my mistakes, that helps! Emotion: smile