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Hi!

please can someone suggest any possible option for "to have a good starting week"? I guess this is not correct, how can I wish someone something like that?

thanks

PAMELA
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Comments  
'Starting week' means what? The first week of a multi-week project? 'To have a good initial week'? Or do you mean 'start to the week', which means the first day of a week-long project?
Hi and thanks for replying.

I mean "to have a good initial week" (at work) Can I use this sentence?

thanks

Regards

Pamela
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Pamela81how can I wish someone something like that?
I hope your first week is [good / successful / great / enjoyable].
I hope you have a [good / successful / great / enjoyable] first week.

After the first week:

I hope your first week was [good / successful / great / enjoyable].

I hope you had a [good / successful / great / enjoyable] first week.

CJ
Thanks CJ

so can I use "first" week or "new" week? Doesn´t make any sense "new starting week"?

thanks

Regards

Pamela
It makes sense, Pamela – it just doesn't sound quite right. 'First week' is quite natural. 'My first week on the job' is a commonly occurring utterance.
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Hi Mister M,

thanks for the reply but maybe I explained the concept in a wrong way. I do not mean that that would be the first week in a new job (from your last reply I understand that you mean this) I just want to wish a good start of the new working week.(to a customer with whom I use to write every week).

Did you understand this ?

Awaiting your response

Thanks

Pamela
Pamela81I just want to wish a good start of the new working week.(to a customer...
In this situation native speakers usually write "Have a good week!" We don't single out the start of the week for any special mention.

CJ
Hi CJ

Thanks for the explanation. So enough will be just "have a good week"...

Regards

Pamela
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