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Hello,

Is there any difference between: "We hunted for rabbits in the hills" and "We hunted rabbits in the hills"? I don't know why, but I think that "to hunt rabbits" could be more active "to hunt for rabbits". It also suggests to me that they actually caught one or two (or more, who knows...) rabbits. I am probably wrong, so I'd like to know what you think.


Thank you.

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Gene93 I don't know why, but I think that "to hunt rabbits" could be more active than? "to hunt for rabbits".

It doesn't strike me that way.

My first take on it is that they are exactly the same in meaning.

My second take on it is that if you hunt for rabbits, you have to hope there are rabbits where you're going hunting, and try to find the rabbits first, and then shoot them. But if you hunt rabbits, you know there are plenty of rabbits around and all you do, in effect, is go to where you know they are and shoot them.

CJ

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Gene93We hunted for rabbits in the hills"

Wildlife biologists looked to see if there were rabbits living there.

Hunting rabbits - they were hungry and wanted rabbit stew.



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Thank you, Jim. That's why I thought that hunting rabbits was more active. Hunting for rabbits could involve waiting for one to come out of its hole or looking for one, as you said. Does "We hunted rabbits in the hills" suggest that they managed to shoot a few rabbits?

Gene93Does "We hunted rabbits in the hills" suggest that they managed to shoot a few rabbits?

No. hunt, look for, and search are all in the same category. They don't imply success, i.e., finding or catching.

CJ

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

The meaning of the two is the same. The difference, if any, is stylistic. The sentence rhythm is different with each, as the result of the different number of words. The first is more ordinary-sounding. This is what you'd normally hear. The second is more aggressive-sounding and literary in tone.