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Hi,
I know I can use "to" instead of "in order to", but... can I always do that? Or is it wrong (=not natural) in certain cases, like after verbs like "need" and want"?
Examples:

I think I need a mother to understand what it feels like to be a children.
Can I use "to" instead of "in order to"? That sentence could mean "A mother that understand what it feels like to be a children, that's what I need"

Schools need volunteers to help children to read.
What does it mean? Is that "to" = "in order to"?
I need you to go to the drugstore to buy some pot.
But this doesn't mean "in order to"... so "to" is used to mean "in order to", but it is ambiguous, right?

Thanks Emotion: smile
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Hi Kooyeen

I agree, native speakers do not always use 'in order to' and 'to' is commonly used instead, especially in more informal English. Most of the time 'to' will be just fine. However, it does pay to be careful.
Thank you Amy! So only the speaker knows what he/she really wants to convey. And if the context is not sufficient, the listener might ask for clarification, right?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Right, that sometimes happens.
YankeeHi Kooyeen

I agree, native speakers do not always use 'in order to' and 'to' is commonly used instead, especially in more informal English. Most of the time 'to' will be just fine. However, it does pay to be careful.

I see. Thank you so much Amy, You've helped me a lot! Emotion: wink