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What do you say to + ∼ ing ?
be opposed to + ∼ ing
object to + ∼ ing
have an objection to + ∼ ing
contribute to + ∼ ing
turn one's attention to + ∼ ing
with a view to + ∼ ing
be equal to + ∼ ing
devote A to + ∼ ing
look forward to + ∼ ing
fall to + ∼ ing

From above, "to" is a preposition, not infinitive.

How do I tell the difference between " to infinitive and to gerund " ??

Pls let me know it.

Thanks & Regards

Terry
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NddadFrom above, "to" is a preposition, not infinitive.

How do I tell the difference between " to infinitive and to gerund " ??
I think you're asking whether you should put the base form or the -ing form of the verb after to.

For example, after Congressman Stratton is opposed to, should you write tax the poor or taxing the poor?
After Congressman Stratton is inclined to, should you write tax the poor or taxing the poor?

There is nothing different between those two sentence beginnings except opposed and inclined. And yet, the correct sentences are

Congressman Stratton is opposed to taxing the poor.
Congressman Stratton is inclined to tax the poor.

If you don't know the grammar of "to be opposed" and "to be inclined", you don't know that we say

... is opposed to it ... and not is opposed to do it,

and that we don't say

... is inclined to it ... but is inclined to do it.

It seems to me that there is a further complication. Depending on the meaning you assign to the part of the sentence that precedes the problem area with the choice, either choice may be possible. For example, both of these are correct:

This horse is used to pull the cart. (We use this horse for the purpose of pulling the cart.)
This horse is used to pulling the cart. (This horse is accustomed to pulling the cart.)

And depending on the meaning of the part that follows the area with the choice, you may have to choose one or the other. These are both correct:

I have several objections to marrying too young. (Marrying too young is what I object to.)
I have several objections to discuss with the city council. (The objections are those which I want to discuss.)
________________________

It seems to me that your best bet is to assume that the infinitive is correct and usual in general, and memorize as exceptions the cases where -ing must be used. It's not a bad idea to memorize the most common cases where -ing is used. You have already listed many of them in your first post.

CJ
Comments  
Hi,


From above, "to" is a preposition, not infinitive. Yes.

How do I tell the difference between " to infinitive and to gerund " ?? To answer your question directly, a gerund ends in -ing but an infinitive does not.

However, perhaps you are really asking 'How do I know when to use an infinitive and when to use a gerund?' I think a practical answer is that, as you get used to speaking a lot of English, you simply become familiar with phrases like this.

Best wishes, Clive
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NddadHow do I tell the difference between " to infinitive and to gerund " ??
If you are asking how you can tell when to is a preposition and when it's part of an infinitive, the answer is simple. If you can put a noun or a pronoun such as it after to, to is a preposition:
I am looking forward to it.
I'll never get used to it.
I object to it.
Incorrect: I used to it. Consequently to is part of an infinitive in this sentence: I used to like her.
CB
Hi, my name is Widi from Indonesia.

Which sentence is grammatically correct? She objects to me buying the house or she objects to my buying the house? Thanks.
Both are in wide use. The first is informal; the second is formally correct.
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Thanks for the answer. I am a near-native English teacher, have been teaching English for more than 20 years, and have never been able to find a grammar book that explains this to both teachers and students. Maybe because book writers take this for granted, but it may be quite confusing to students. You say that by becoming familiar with it may be a solution...yes, like for a child who grows up in an English-speaking family. Anyhow, the simple explanation that "to" in one case is a preposition and in the other is the particle of the infinitive helps to understand the difference but still it doesn't give non-native speakers the whole explanation. Books should include a unit devoted to all the verbs and expressions of to + -ing (the same way they do with "used to", "get used to", "be used to" and "look forward to".
AnonymousBooks should include a unit devoted to all the verbs and expressions of to + -ing
Try this reference:
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:English_catenative_verbs
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Terry

Most of the phrases above are "phrasal verbs" that are "prepositional verbs" (a verb + a preposition). A preposition always requires an object (noun) so the gerund must be used.

There are lists online of phrasal verbs (prepositional verbs and particle verbs)

"with a view to" is not a verb, but is in fact a prepositional phrase itself.