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1. He is to arrive here. = 2. He is going to arrive here. (same?)

1. They are to leave. = 2. They are going to leave. (same?)

1. You are to listen to me. = 2. You are going to listen to me. (same?)

If same, which one do you use often? (1or2)
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Hi,

1. He is to arrive here. = 2. He is going to arrive here. (same?)

In some situations, they mean the same, but here are some comments on differences.

He is to arrive here.

A plan has been made and the schedule set.

Another possible meaning is that he must arrive here (ie an order, eg from a parent to a child, You are to go to bed immediately).

He is going to arrive here.

A plan has been made.

Best wishes, Clive
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In ordinary conversation I don't use is to, are to, was to, were to. They seem more formal to my ear, and more appropriate to writing.

is to can mean is supposed to, is expected to, is scheduled to, is going to, ought to, must, should, will or similar things.

CJ