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Hi,

I'm back. Been busy with works and hadn't had much time to come to the forum. I have a list full of question to ask but let me go slow with it. I might need Goodman's help as well with my Techinical writing, hope he is still around:) Goodman, please response to this message if you happen to see this so that I know you are there ready to help ya...Emotion: smile

Okie, enough talk. I have a question with the use of 'to'. I'm not sure whether it sounds alright when I use 'ing' following 'to'. Please see the sentence below.

1. There is no shortcut (any other word to replace this?) to learning a language. It needs lots of hardworks and determination than you can imagine.

- Is this sentence sounds natural?

- Is the 'ing' being gramatically right in the sentence considering there is a 'to' in front of it?

Thanks for all the replied~
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Hey joeviee, welcome back,

There is no shortcut to learn a language.

You only use an -ing form following "to" when "to" is a preposition, like "look forward to". You'll master them after a short period of time, don't worry. Good luck.

+1

Here are just a few cases where to is a preposition, not part of an infinitive. The -ing form is used with all prepositions; to is no exception.

shortcut to learning ...
approach to studying ...
key to learning ...
objection to going ...
secret to knowing ...
path to learning ...
aversion to doing ...

reaction to seeing ...

reference( s ) to going ...

with a view to finding ...

lend (itself, themselves, ...) to ...

object to, look forward to, pay attention to, take exception to, take to, resort to, get around to, contribute to, devote time to, amount to, admit to

be:
restricted to, limited to, reduced to, used to, accustomed to, averse to, given to, committed to
, opposed to, addicted to, essential to, devoted to, dedicated to

CJ
See also spend, to motivating and energizing, Gerunds question.. when to use & when not to

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
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No.

In the sentence 'learning' is a verbal, a gerund, and has noun function.
'Shortcut to' In this prepositional phrase 'to' is not the infinitive 'to', but a preposition.

There is no shortcut to learning is fine grammatically.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=73060&dict=CALD

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Thanks alot for all your suggestions. It is definitely no shortcut to learning English andI love devoting all of my time to memorizing all the exceptions that only English langauge has.

Am I right? Emotion: embarrassed
There is definitely no... .
I love to devote is correct too. Otherwise your sentence is fine. Emotion: wink
"all the exceptions that only the English langauge has" Have you tried Hungarian?
If it were the most important international language most people would commit suicide.
Try out our live chat room.
JoevieeThanks alot for all your suggestions. It is definitely no shortcut to learning English andI love devoting all of my time to memorizing all the exceptions that only English langauge has.

Am I right? Emotion: embarrassed
There is an extremely easy way to determine whether to is a preposition or not: put a pronoun or a noun after it. If that is possible, to is a preposition:

I am used to it.
I am used to criticism.

Hence:
I am used to getting up early.

Cheers
CB
Thank you all. I'm getting old, that was a good reminder of that! And at the same time encouraging to review my grammar.
joeviee,

That is an excellent illustration that you have understood the idea! A+! Emotion: smile

Just a few minor points not related to the main idea:

There is definitely no shortcut to learning English and I love devoting all of my time to memorizing all the exceptions that only the English language has.

CJ

Go easy on the memorization. All your time? Don't you have to stop and eat occasionally? Emotion: smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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